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NOTTINGHAMSHIRE

FACTS AND FICTIONS:

A MISCELLANY OF

PROVERBS AND RHYMES;
ECCENTRICS AND ECCENTRIOITIES;
CHURCH AND CHURCHYARD GLEANINGS;

BALLADS AND SONGS;
AND MORE LEGENDS, TRADITIONS,

AND ANECDOTES.

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JOHN POTTER BRISCOE, F. R. H. S., &c.,

PRINCIPAL LIBRARIAN OF THE NOTTINGHAM FREE POBLIC

LIBRARIES.

SECOND SERIES.

NOTTINGHAM:
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY SHEPHERD BROS. ANGEL Row.

1877.

“If an Editor unites a large share of accuracy, even with a
moderate portion of erudition; if he collects materials with
industry, and uses them with judgment; if he distinguishes
between ingenuity and refinement, and separates useful in-
formation from ostentatious pedantry, he will have a claim to
public

favour, though he should not possess the exquisite taste
of a Heyne, the profound erudition of a Hemsterhuis, or the
keen perception of a Porson.”

DR. PARR.

..9, 10

PART V.

ECCENTRICS AND ECCENTRICITIES.

Goody Ryley

Vincent Eyre.............

Mrs. Waterhill

David Love..........

PAGE

11

11

11

12

Old General

Darker, the Miser

Shelford Tommy

PAGE

13

14

14

PART VI.

CHURCH AND CHURCH YARD GLEANINGS.

Blidworth

Bridgford on the Hill

Bridgford. West,..

Bunney

Burton-Joyce.....

Clayworth

Clifton

Colwick

Cuckney

Eakring

Edwalton

Edwinstowe

Fillingley

PAGE

21

22

20

16

22

22

16

16

22

17

17

17

23

Flawford

Hucknall Torkard

Muskham

Newark

Nottingham

Ollerton

Oxton

Ratcliffe-upon-Soar

Selstone

Shelford

Sibthorp

Struton-le-Staple

Wilford

PAGE

23

23

24

17

..18, 24, 25

18

19

19

25

19

19

19

.20, 25

MORE LEGENDS, TRADITIONS, AND ANECDOTES.

PAGE

PAGE

Maids of Collingham and the

An athletic Baronet's friendship... 57

Danes

46

Love and Potatoes

57

The King deprived of his beer at

S. Fox and the idle Lads

58

Nottingham

46

A Quaker's retort.

58

Legend of St. Catherine's Well 47

The "Wicked Lord' and his pet

Crickets

59

Lord Chief Justice and his hostess 48

49

Nan Scott of Holme

59

Young Byron at the Theatre

False Alarm

49

59

Byron at School

Byron and the Shoemaker.............. 60

A Bishop rebuked by a Notting-

A wild freak of Byron's

60

ham Vicar

49

60

Nottingham Rector and his tithe-

Byron's flunkey

The White Lady of Newstead

50

60

pig...

A Notts. Clerical notoriety

61

The Parson and his boon com-

panions

50

The Notts. Clergyman and the

London Pickpocket

61

How the Stocking-frame was in-

A Noble Stocking Weaver... 62

vented

51

A rash Vow fulfilled

63

Pilgrimage by Deputy

52

Wonderful fulfilment of a wish 63

Marshall Tallard

52

Putting salt on their tails... 63

Spirit' Knocking in Nottingham 53

A conceited clergyman and the

An Electioneering Incident 53

Author.....

63

Biter bitten

54

Nottingham Pluck

64

An extremely courteous Notting- Some sayings and doings of the

ham tradesman....

54

“old General”

64

Newspaper Proprietor and the A witty Nottingham Lawyer

War

55 “Matter Enough"

66

Nottingham Auctioneers' blunders 55 An Old Head on Young Shoulders 67

The absent-minded Parson

55 Mistaken Attention......

67

The pugilistic Squire and the Richard's himself again

67

Sweep

56 The Tale-bearer punished............ 68

Fox in Nottingham Gaol............ 56 Sir Gervase Clifton

68

...

...... 65

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE FACTS AND FICTIONS,

PART IV.

PROVERBS AND RHYMES.

“Even shavings of gold are carefully to be kept."-Fuller.

"THE LITTLE SMITH OF NOTTINGHAM,

WHO DOTH THE WORK WHICH NO MAN CAN." As

to believe that it is of much greater age than that. Fuller, in his Worthies, states :—“England hath afforded many rare workmen in this kind, whereof he may seem an apprentice to Vulcan, and inferior only to his master (in making the invisible net), who made a lock and key, with a chain in ten links, which a flea could draw. But who this ‘Little Smith' and great workman was, and where he lived, I know not; and have cause to suspect that this of Nottingham is a periphrasis of Nemo, Ou Tis, or a person who never was. And the proverb, by way of sarcasm, is applied to such, who being conceited of their own skill, pretend to the achievement of impossibilities.” Deering thought there might be a little fellow in Nottingham who might so far excel all others in his branch of work as to give occasion to the proverb, which at first may have been applied to persons excelling many others in their respective handicrafts, though it is not used by way of sarcasm. This proverb must be several hundred years old, as the iron manufacture ceased to be the principal manufacture of Nottingham about 1650, after being carried on for a number of years.

NOTTINGHAM ONCE STOOD ON MAPPERLEY HILLS." This old saying has reference to the greater part of the bricks of which Nottingham is built being made at that place.

“ WHAT! YOU HAVE BEEN TO DUNKIRK." Between the top of the light shambles and a passage which leads from Smithy Row, Nottingham, is a space which used to be called

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