The Rule of Our Warfare: John Henry Newman and the True Christian Life : a Reader

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Scepter Publishers, 2003 - 195 Seiten
Moral and spiritual guidance from one of the most distinguished and versatile champions of English spirituality.That's what Pope John Paul II called the great nineteenth-century convert John Henry Cardinal Newman -- and this new collection of his writings on virtually every aspect of life in Christ shows why.Editor John Hulsman here presents brief, readable excerpts from Newman's sermons on faith, the true Christian life, temptations, the world, doubts, and the mysteries of the Catholic Faith. These selections give you a comprehensive overview of Newman's profound and influential teachings on daily life as a Christian, including his wisdom on the Church, God's Providence, the Mass, the intercession of Mary, prayer, temptation and sin, the Christian character, happiness, and much more. Full of Newman's elegant prose and piercing Christian insight, this volume is not only a winning introduction to Newman: it's also a remarkable resource for daily spiritual reading.
 

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Inhalt

Introduction II
11
Note on the Text
21
Private Judgement and Divine Voice
23
The Cross of Christ
24
Living Faith
26
Faith and Fear
27
Faith Leading to Truth
28
Saving Grace
30
Obedience
96
Watching and Praying and Meditating
97
SelfExamination
99
The Spirit of Love
101
The Lack of Will
105
Neglecting the One Thing Needful
106
Enduring the Worlds Ridicule
108
SelfDeceit and SelfKnowledge
109

A Lifelong Act
31
Continual Conversion
32
Filling the Void Within
34
Holiness through Infirmity
35
Divine Calls
37
The Tranquil Christian Course
39
The Ventures of Faith
41
Preparing for Happiness
42
THE TRUE CHRISTIAN LIFE 15 The Scriptural Picture of the True Christian Life
45
Serving God from Our Youth
47
Gods Gift
48
The New Christian Character
50
Gradual Awakening
51
The Root of Charity
53
The One Happiness
54
Uniting High and Low
56
Prayer without Ceasing
57
24 Conscience
59
Vigilance against Sin
60
True Christians and Professing Christians
61
SelfSurrender
63
The Duty of Intercession
65
Intercession and Mary
66
Worldly Ambition and Heavenly Ambition
67
Fear and Love
69
Devotion and Intellect
70
The Church and the Individual Soul
71
Advancement and Abasement
72
Leaving the Goods of the Earth
74
Watching for Christ
76
Watching and Waiting
79
Serving Our Lord in the World
80
Living by a Higher Law
82
Private Judgement and Divine Aid
84
His Gifts
86
The Defect of Cheerful Religion
88
Abstinence and Christian Love
90
Fasting and Feasting
91
The Christian Temper
92
Perfecting Natural Virtue
94
Individual Professions of Faith
112
The Paradox of Christian Knowledge
114
A Smooth and Easy Life
116
SelfSatisfaction
119
Unmeaning Benevolence
120
Unreal Words
122
Looking at Sin as He Would Look at It
123
THE WORLD 62 Worldly Unbelief
125
Consolation in the Midst of the World
126
The Dangers of Worldly Advantages
127
The Religion of the Natural Man
129
Putting Away Childish Things
130
The Pursuit of Gain
133
The Religion of the Day
135
Artificiality and Simplicity
138
The Inventions of Reason
140
The Hidden God
143
Christianity in the World
144
Enlarging the Mind
146
Doubt and Devotion
147
Trials of Faith
148
Difficulties and Obscurities
149
Deferred Rewards
151
The Sternness of Scripture
154
The Mystery of Religion
156
Recognizing the Holy Spirit
158
Divine Ordinance
161
The Church Invisible
162
Gods Universe
163
The Mind of God
164
The Paradox of the Second Coming
166
Gods Providence
167
The Deposit of Faith
169
The Mass
170
Time and Eternity
171
Devotion to Saints
174
The End Time
176
The Unseen
178
About the Author
195
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Über den Autor (2003)

English clergyman John Henry Newman was born on February 21, 1801. He was educated at Trinity College, University of Oxford. He was the leader of the Oxford movement and cardinal after his conversion to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1822, he received an Oriel College fellowship, which was then the highest distinction of Oxford scholarship, and was appointed a tutor at Oriel. Two years later, he became vicar of St. Mary's, the Anglican church of the University of Oxford, and exerted influence on the religious thought through his sermons. When Newman resigned his tutorship in 1832, he made a tour of the Mediterranean region and wrote the hymn "Lead Kindly Light." He was also one of the chief contributors to "Tracts for the Times" (1833-1841), writing 29 papers including "Tract 90", which terminated the series. The final tract was met with opposition because of its claim that the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England are aimed primarily at the abuses of Roman Catholicism. Newman retired from Oxford in 1842 to the village of Littlemore. He spent three years in seclusion and resigned his post as vicar of St. Mary's on October 9, 1845. During this time, he wrote a retraction of his criticisms of the Roman Catholic Church and after writing his "Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine," he became a Roman Catholic. The following year, he went to Rome and was ordained a priest and entered the Congregation of the Oratory. The remainder of Newman's life was spent in the house of the Oratory that he established near Birmingham. He also served as rector of a Roman Catholic university that the bishops of Ireland were trying to establish in Dublin from 1854-1858. While there, he delivered a series of lectures that were later published as "The Idea of a University Defined" (1873), which says the function of a university is the training of the mind instead of the giving of practical information. In 1864, Newman published "Apologia pro Vita Sua (Apology for His Life)" in response to the charge that Roman Catholicism was indifferent to the truth. It is an account of his spiritual development and regarded as both a religious autobiography and English prose. Newman also wrote "An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent" (1870), and the novels "Loss and Gain" (1848), Callista" (1856) and "The Dream of Gerontius" (1865). Newman was elected an honorary fellow of Trinity College, Oxford, in 1877 and was made cardinal by Pope Leo XIII in 1879. He died on August 11, 1890.

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