Annual Report of the American Historical Association

Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1897
 

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Inhalt

Compensation of members
34
Oath to the Constitution
35
Changing the date of inauguration day and the time of ho sessions of Congress
36
Extra sessions of Congress quorum and vote
38
Discipline of members of Congress
39
Publication of the journals
40
Incompatibility of other functions for Representa 22 Apportionment of Representatives
42
Limitation of the number of Representatives
54
Election of Representatives
56
Proving elections to the House
59
Election of Senators
60
Filling vacancies in the Senate
63
Election of executive officials
64
Punishment of official misconduct
65
Status of the Executive Page 141 142 142
66
The present status of amendments relating to the legislative department
67
CHAPTER III
69
Judges to be ineligible to other offices
70
Impeachment
71
Addition of VicePresidents
72
Qualifications of the Executive
73
Establishment and jurisdiction of inferior courts
74
Choice of President and VicePresident
75
Suits against States
76
The twelfth amendment
77
Choice of electors by districts
80
Choice of electors by general ticket in each State
84
Election of the President by the people as the legislature of the State shall direct
86
Election of President and VicePresident by a general direct vote
87
Election of President and VicePresident directly by dis
89
tricts
91
Election of President and VicePresident directly by a com bination of districts and votes at large
92
Page
93
Election of President by a direct vote by States
94
Election from candidates designated by the States
98
Election of President by
100
Election of President from Presidential Sections
103
Election of President and VicePresident by the voters as Congress shall direct
104
Election of President and VicePresident in case of no choice at the first election
105
Discussion of schemes for Presidential Election
111
Time of election
114
Federal control over the election of President
115
Settlement of contested Presidential Elections
116
Exclusion of electors from appointment by the President
122
The veto
129
Limitations upon the appointing power of the President
134
Regulation of the power of removal
136
Civilservice reform
138
Military power of the President 63 The pardoning power of the President
140
States and the General Government 78 Summary of the propositions relative to the judiciary 144
144
153
153
CHAPTER V
163
PROPOSED AMENDMENTS AFFECTING THE POWERS OF THE GOVERNMENT 79 Division of powers between the States and the General Gov...
165
e
167
Performance of national functions by the States
169
Guaranty of the State governments
170
Acknowledgement of secession
172
Limitations on secession
173
Limitations on the States by the Reconstr ments 89 Territorial powers
175
Exclusive power of Congress over the seat of government and other sites
176
Abridging territory
177
Annexation of territory
178
Admission of new States
180
Representation of the Territories and the District of Columbia in Congress 95 Disposition of the public lands
181
Relation of the United States with individuals
182
The first ten amendments
183
98
185
Admission of States
202
111
203
The District of Columbia and places under Federal juris diction
204
Right of transit with slaves
205
115
206
116
208
The foreign slave trade
209
The question of abolition
210
Abolition in the seceding States
211
Compensated emancipation
212
Compensation for slaves prohibited
213
122
214
123
217
Citizenship of negroes denied
218
The fourteenth amendment
219
Further enforcement of civil rights
222
Disability of participants in the rebellion
223
129
226
Extension of the suffrage to negroes
227
131
229
Miscellaneous propositions on the suffrage since the fifteenth amendment
235
Suffrage of the Chinese
237
136
239
Early objections
240
138
242
140
243
Taxation of corporations by States 215
245
Export duties
246
Payment of the Confederate debt
247
Claims for damages arising out of the civil
248
Payment of the national debt
249
Protective tariffs 251
252
Status of financial legislation 233
253
Commercial power 234
254
National banks
255
Issuing of bank notes
257
Legaltender notes
258
Internal improvements
260
Navigation laws and embargoes
263
Bankruptcy laws
265
The status of commercial powers
266
Foreign affairs
267
Declaration of war
269
The army
270
Military pensions
271
Prohibition of polygamy
272
Protection to labor
273
Education
274
The States to provide free public schools
275
Religion
277
Summary of amendments on the powers of the Government
279
CHAPTER VI
281
Proposed amendments in Congress
284
Ratification by conventions
286
Regulation of the ratification by the legislature
287
Propositions to change the majorities required by Article 1
292
Ratification by popular vote
293
What constitutes twothirds inajority under Article V
295
Is the signature of the governor essential to an amenil ment to the Federal Constitution approved by the legis lature of the State
297
What constitutes threefourths of the States
298
Can a State reconsider its action upon an amendment
299
The difficulties of amendment
300
APPENDIX Calendar and bibliography of proposed amendments
306
Titles of nobility
310
176
313
Distribution of the surplus 250
343
Appropriation bills 250
398

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Seite 187 - If any citizen of the United States shall accept, claim, receive, or retain any title of nobility or honor, or shall without the consent of Congress, accept or retain any present, pension, office, or emolument of any kind whatever, from any emperor, king, prince, or foreign power, such person shall cease to be a citizen of the United States, and shall be incapable of holding any office of trust or profit under them, or either of them.
Seite 179 - Florida also, whensoever it may be rightfully obtained, shall become a part of the United States, its white inhabitants shall thereupon be citizens, and shall stand, as to their rights and obligations, on the same footing with other citizens of the United States, in analogous situations.
Seite 246 - ... the Constitution of the United States which prohibits a State from passing any law impairing the obligation of a contract. Whatever is granted is secured subject only to the limitations and reservations in the charter or in the laws or constitutions which govern it.
Seite 211 - All slaves who shall have enjoyed actual freedom by the chances of the war, at any time before the end of the rebellion, shall be forever free; but all owners of such, who shall not have been disloyal, shall be compensated for them...
Seite 138 - That no man, or set of men, are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from the community, but in consideration of public services; which, not being descendible, neither ought the offices of magistrate, legislator or judge to be hereditary.
Seite 211 - States may then have voluntarily adopted, or thereafter may voluntarily adopt, immediate or gradual abolishment of slavery within their respective 'limits; and that the effort to colonize persons of African descent with their consent upon this continent or elsewhere, with the previously obtained consent of the governments existing there, will be continued.
Seite 44 - Congress, that there shall be not less than one hundred Representatives, nor less than one representative for every forty thousand persons, until the number of representatives shall amount to two hundred, after which the proportion shall be so regulated by Congress, that there shall not be less than two hundred Representatives, nor more than one Representative for every fifty thousand persons.
Seite 260 - Their patriotism would certainly prefer its continuance and application to the great purposes of the public education, roads, rivers, canals, and such other objects of public improvement as it may be thought proper to add to the constitutional enumeration of federal powers.
Seite 14 - Resolved that provision ought to be made for the amendment of the Articles of Union whensoever it shall seem necessary, and that the assent of the National Legislature ought not to be required thereto.
Seite 152 - We have erred in this point, by copying England, where certainly it is a good thing to have the judges independent of the King. But we have omitted to copy their caution also, which makes a judge removable on the address of both legislative Houses. That there should be public functionaries independent...

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