The Collection of Building and Ornamental Stones in the U.S. National Museum: A Hand-book and Catalogue

Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1889 - 372 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 418 - It was not until the early part of the present century that its potential value was recognized and wide applications for its use were developed.
Seite 310 - as a rule," run perpendicular, or approximately so, to the planes of bedding, and descend vertically at not very unequal distances, so that the portions of the rock between them, when seen from a distance, appear like so many wall-like masses. An important feature of these joints, as mentioned by this authority, is the direction in which they intersect each other. In general they have two dominant trends, one coincident on the whole with the direction in which the strata are inclined from the horizon,...
Seite 378 - The most interesting building material in the entire state of Maryland is the " Potomac marble," " calico rock " or " Potomac breccia," which has been used occasionally for the greater portion of the century.
Seite 360 - Liberty ; also one about t\vo and a half miles westward of New London. Continuing in the same direction it is seen at the meadows of Goose Creek, where it has been quarried to some extent. Continuing...
Seite 443 - Sandstones are composed of rounded and angular grains of sand so cemented and compacted as to form a solid rock. The cementing material may be either silica, carbonate of lime, an iron oxide, or clayey matter. Upon the character of this cementing material, more perhaps than upon the character of the grains themselves, is dependent the color of the rock and its adaptability for architectural purposes. If silica alone is present the rock is light-colored, and frequently so intensely hard that it can...
Seite 334 - Soft brick 2.211 16.46 Hard brick, 2.294 1.07 Marble, coarse dolomite, Mount Pleasant, New York 2.860 0.91 The specimens operated upon, it should be stated, were cut in the form of inch cubes. Each was immersed for half an hour in the boiling solution of sulphate of soda, and then hung up to dry, this performance being repeated daily throughout the four weeks which the experiment lasted. Although as above noted this process is practically abandoned, the series of tests given was productive of certain...
Seite 315 - There must be provided twice as many iron wedges as holes, and one-half of them must be fully as long as the hole is deep and made round at one end, just fit to drop into the hole, and the other half may be made a little longer, and thicker one way, and blunt pointed. All the holes must have their wedges drove together, one after another, gently, that they may strain all alike. You may hear by their ringing when they strain well. Then with the sharp edge of the sledge strike hard on the rock in the...
Seite 315 - When this work was finished, it was the wonder of the country round. People coming from a distance made it an object to see and admire this great structure. The wonder was that stone enough could be found in the vicinity of Boston fit for the hammer to construct such an entire building. But it seemed to be universally conceded, that enough more like it could not be found to build such another.
Seite 324 - When adjusted for work it maybe braced by the pointed legs shown. The boring apparatus is attached by a swivel to a perpendicular guide-bar. This guide-bar is secured to the boiler behind it, which forms the main support of the machine. Upon the guide-bar the boring apparatus may be raised or lowered at pleasure, for the purpose of boring a series of holes in a perpendicular lino if desired.
Seite 478 - As yet the stone has been but little used in this country, though a movement has of late been on foot for its introduction. Portland stone. — This stone, which has been in use in England since the middle of the seventeenth century, is a lightcolored Jurassic limestone from quarries on the Isle of Portland, near Weymouth. In composition it is a nearly pure carbonate of lime, but its texture is too uneven to recommend it for other than massive structures. It was used in the construction of St. Paul's...

Bibliografische Informationen