The dying speeches and behaviour of the several state prisoners that have been executed the last 300 years

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Printed for J. Brotherton and W. Meadows, 1720 - 495 Seiten
 

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Seite 139 - This made him more irresolute than the conjuncture of his affairs would admit. If he had been of a rougher and more imperious nature, he would have found more respect and duty...
Seite 116 - ... of a personal courage equal to his best parts ; so that he was an enemy not to be wished wherever he might have been made a friend, and as much to be apprehended, where he was so, as any man could deserve to be ; and therefore his death was no less pleasing to the one party, than it was condoled in the other.
Seite 133 - I desire their liberty and freedom '"' "'" as much as anybody whatsoever, but I must tell you that their liberty and freedom consists in having government, in having those laws by which their lives and their goods may be most their own. It is not their having a share in the government ; that is nothing appertaining to them. A subject and a sovereign are clean different things...
Seite 71 - When I am gone no doubt you shall be sought to by many, for the world thinks that I was very rich. But take heed of the pretences of men, and their affections, for they last not but in honest and worthy men ; and no greater misery can befall you in this life than to become a prey, and afterwards to be despised.
Seite 114 - And even with them who were able to preserve themselves from his infusions, and discerned those opinions to be fixed in him with which they could not comply, he always left the character of an ingenious and conscientious person.
Seite 344 - ... the Pope, or any other authority or person whatsoever, or without any hope of any such dispensation from any person or authority whatsoever, or without thinking that I am or can be acquitted before God, or man, or absolved of this declaration, or any part thereof, although the Pope, or any other person or persons, or power whatsoever, should dispense with or annul the same, or declare that it was null and void from the beginning.
Seite 112 - ... very weighty speaker ; and after he had heard a full debate, and observed how the House was like to be inclined, took up the argument, and shortly, and clearly, and craftily so stated it, that he commonly conducted it to the conclusion he desired ; and if he found he could not do that, he was never without the dexterity to divert the debate to another time, and to prevent the determining any thing in the negative, which might prove inconvenient in the future.
Seite 135 - Consider, it will soon carry you a great way; it will carry you from earth to heaven; and there you shall find, to your great joy, the prize to which you hasten, a crown of glory.
Seite 116 - ... parts ; so that he was an enemy not to be wished wherever he might have been made a friend ; and as much to be apprehended where he was so, as any man could deserve to be. And therefore his death was no less congratulated on the one party, than it was condoled in the other.
Seite 320 - For this commandment which I command thee this day, it is not hidden from thee, neither is it far off. It is not in heaven, that thou shouldest say, Who shall go up for us to heaven, and bring it unto us, that we may hear it, and do it?

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