An Historical and Descriptive Account of British America: Comprehending Canada, Upper and Lower, Nova Scotia, New-Brunswick, Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, the Bermudas, and the Fur Countries, as Also an Account of the Manners and Present State of the Aboriginal Tribes, Band 1

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Harper & brothers, 1840
 

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Seite 251 - An Act to amend an Act of the fourteenth year of His Majesty, King George the Third, for establishing a fund towards defraying the Charges of the Administration of Justice and the Support of the Civil Government...
Seite 161 - When the strangers arrived, they found the fire kindled, the caldron boiling, and, being courteously received, were invited to sit down. The Iroquois then asked the chief if, after so long a journey, he did not feel hungry. As he replied in the affirmative, they rushed upon him, and began to cut slices from his arms, and throw them into the pot ; soon after, they presented them to him half cooked. They then cut pieces from other parts of his body, and continued their torture till he died in lingering...
Seite 215 - I am not ashamed to own to you that my heart does not exult in the midst of this success. I have lost but a friend in General Wolfe. Our country has lost a sure support and a perpetual honour.
Seite 257 - Company, though they would be ready to guard against all abuses, and even to receive any suggestions on the subject. The existing pensions were also to be retained, but the future power of granting them would be surrendered. In regard to the critical question of the elective legislative council, it was said, — " The king is most unwilling to admit, as open to debate, the question, whether one of the vital principles of the provincial government shall undergo alteration.
Seite 34 - ... action. We are not aware of such an effect being produced on any other cataract, nor does Mr Lyell refer to any, although several falls are known to have existed from the remotest antiquity. The statements made by the neighbouring inhabitants are so vague, and differ so very widely, that little importance can be attached to them. The only changes which can be considered well authenticated are the occasional breaking down of the rocks in the middle of the great fall. Of this an example occurred...
Seite 246 - On the meeting of that body, however, M. Papineau was elected speaker; an appointment which, on account of his violent opposition to the measures of administration, Lord Dalhousie refused to sanction. The consequence was, that no session of either house was held in the winter of 1827-1828.* Discontent had now risen to an alarming height ; and in the latter year a petition was presented to the king, signed by 87,000 inhabitants, complaining of the conduct of successive governors, particularly of the...
Seite 47 - ... houses. The vicinity is adorned with beautiful villas. Of the public edifices, the new Catholic cathedral, completed in 1829, is undoubtedly the most splendid, and is, in fact, superior to any other in British America. Its style is a species of Gothic ; it is 255 feet 6 inches in length, and 134 feet 6 inches in breadth. The flanks rise sixty-one feet above the terrace ; and there are six towers, of which the three belonging to the main front are 220 feet high. It is faced with excellent stone,...
Seite 28 - The accompaniments, in short, rank here as nothing. There is merely the display, on a scale elsewhere unrivalled, of the phenomena appropriate to this class of objects. There is the spectacle of a falling sea, the eye filled almost to its utmost reach by the rushing of mighty waters. There is the awful plunge into the abyss beneath,, and the reverberation thence in endless lines of foam, and in numberless whirlpools and eddies ; there are clouds of spray that fill the whole atmosphere, amid which...
Seite 100 - We are happy in having buried under ground the " red axe, that has so often been dyed with the blood of our " brethren. Now, in this sort, we inter the axe, and plant the " tree of Peace. We plant a tree, whose top will reach the Sun; " and its branches spread abroad, so that it shall be seen afar off. " May its growth never be stifled and choked; but may it shade " both your country and ours with its leaves!
Seite 126 - The Hurons were a numerous people, whose very extensive territory reached from the Algonquin frontier to the borders of the great lake bearing their name. They were also more industrious, and derived an abundant subsistence from the fine territory of Upper Canada. But they were at the same time more effeminate and voluptuous, and had less of the proud independence of savage life, having chiefs hereditary in the female line, to whom they paid considerable deference.