The Observatory, Band 3

Cover
Editors of the Observatory, 1880
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 639 - It is a singular fact that, among all the writings on the nebular hypothesis, I have never seen a reference to this presentation of it by its most distinguished advocate ; and yet this is the true spirit of scientific astronomy. Laplace did not wish to exempt his own theories from criticism, and neither should any one. In astronomy there is no final human authority, no sj'nod or council, but simply an appeal to reason and observation.
Seite 654 - ... interval, when it is 90° from the sun, and at the two extremities of the major axis of the parallactic ellipse. The paper contains the discussion of the observations of forty-two objects, chiefly red and variable stars. The result is that in almost every case is the parallax certainly less than I", and most probably does not exceed 0"'5.
Seite 404 - But if one of them was sufficiently powerful to unite successively by its attraction all the others about its centre, the ring of vapours would be changed into one sole spheroidical mass, circulating about the Sun, with a motion of rotation in the same direction with that of revolution.
Seite 99 - BAZLEY. —THE STARS IN THEIR COURSES : A Twofold Series of Maps, with a Catalogue, showing how to identify, at any time of the year, all stars down to the 5.6 magnitude, inclusive of Heis, which are clearly visible in English latitudes. By TS Bazley, MA. Author of "Notes on the Epicycloidal Cutting Frame.
Seite 542 - The catalogue of stars for 1880 is divided into four sections, separated by the equator and the parallels of 45°. It contains 5719 stars. M. Houzeau has examined the distribution of the stars in four ways : 1, with respect to the solar equator; 2, with respect to the direction of the sun's proper motion ; 3, perpendicular to this direction ; 4, with respect to the milky way. No law whatever was found in the first three ways, while the fourth mode of proceeding confirmed W. Struve's conclusion that...
Seite 404 - These masses should assume a spheroidal form, with a rotary motion in the direction of that of their revolution, because their inferior particles have a less real velocity than the superior; they have therefore constituted so many planets in a state of vapor. But if one of them was sufficiently powerful to unite successively by its attraction all the others about its center, the ring of vapors would be changed into one spheroidal mass, circulating about the sun, with a motion of rotation in the same...
Seite 159 - In response to a letter of inquiry, Thomas T. Bates, Esq., editor of the Grand Traverse Herald, has given me the following additional statement: "A night watch on our streets, an intelligent, cool-headed man, gives me in substance this : Was on watch ; passing from due west to east ; saw a great light ; turned quickly and saw a ball of fire over my right shoulder ; turned to left and watched it until it disappeared ; when first seen it appeared about as high as ordinary...
Seite 404 - These masses should assume a spheroidical form, with a rotatory motion in the direction of that of their revolution, because their inferior particles have a less real velocity than the superior ; they have therefore constituted so many planets in a state of vapour.
Seite 589 - Lagrange reduced the question of perturbations to its simplest form, and gave the means of deducing easily the most interesting conclusions on the past and future condition of our solar system. To supplement this great theorist there was needed another kind of genius. Combining the highest mathematical skill with unequalled sagacity and common sense in its application, Laplace gathered up and presented in a complete and practical form the whole theory of celestial mechanics. Besides his numerous...
Seite 499 - ... second. In another branch of photography, that of the reproduction of spectral lines, for which so much is due to Rutherfurd and Draper, I know nothing more surprising than the recent success of Captain Abney (of the Royal Engineers) at South Kensington, who has photographed the red end of the spectrum, and far beyond the red end, to a wave-length of about 12,000 tenth-metres. As this statement may of itself convey no clear idea to some of my audience, let me explain in less technical language...

Bibliografische Informationen