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suppose they broke away from you now, I ran off at full speed in the direction the and got into the rich meadow yonder, I king had indicated. should have more trespass money to pay

The monarch, who could now indulge than my year's wages come to. Just look in a hearty laugh, sat himself down on a at the Court Gardener there, him with tree-stump which the goose-herd had prethe black head and wings; he is a regular viously occupied, to await the return of deserter, a false knave; he is for all the his messenger. But it really seemed as if world one of the court trash, and they, his feathered charge had discovered that we all know, are good for nothing. He the whip was no longer wielded by their would lead you a fine dance! Nay, nay, accustomed prompt and vigilant comit would never do.”

mander, for the treacherous “Court GarThe king felt ready to burst with sup- dener” suddenly stretched out his long pressed laughter; but mastering himself, neck, and, after reconnoitring on all sides, asked, with tolerable composure: “Why, uttered two or three shrill screams; upon can I not keep geese in order as easily as which, as if a tempest had all at once men? I have plenty of them to control.” rushed under the multitude of wings, the

“ You,” again said the boy, sneeringly, whole flock rose simultaneously into the as he measured the monarch from head to air, and before the king could recover foot; "they must be silly ones, then; but from his surprise, they were careering, perhaps you're a schoolmaster? Yet, with lond screams, toward the rich mead. even if ye be, it is much easier to manage ows bordering the lake, over which they boys than geese; that I can tell ye.” quickly spread themselves in all possible

" It may be so," said the king; “but directions. come, make short work of it: will you At the first outburst, the royal herdsbring the book or will you not ?"

man called “halt,” with all his might; he “ I would gladly do it,” stammered the brandished and tried hard to crack the boy, 6 but

whip, but extracted no sound which could “I'll be answerable for the geese,” cried intimidate the Court Gardener. He then the king, “and pay all damages, if such ran to and fro, until

, teeming with perspithere be.”

ration, and yielding to adverse fate, he This decided the question; and so, after reseated himself on the tree-stump, and, exacting a promise that his substitute leaving the geese to their own devices, would pay special attention to the doings quietly awaited the return of his messenger. of the stately gander, whom he designa “The boy was right, after all,” said he ted as the “Court Gardener,” and pro- to himself: “it is easier to govern a couple nounced an incorrigible breaker of bounds, of millions of men than a fock of plaguy and prime seducer of the flock, he placed geese,' and a court gardener can do a deal the whip in the king's hands, and set off of mischief.” on his errand.

Meanwhile the boy had reached the But scarcely had he run a few yards bench, found the book, and sped back in when he turned back again.

triumph, little dreaming of the discomfit“ What is the matter now?” called out ure his substitute bad experienced. But the king

when, on coming close up to the king, he “ Crack the whip,” resounded in return. looked round in vain for his charge, and The monarch swung it with his best effort, still worse, when their vociferous cackling bụt procured no sounding whack. “I led his

eyes in the direction of the forbid. thought so !” exclaimed the rustic. “A den meadow, he was so overwhelmed that, schoolmaster, forsooth, and can not crack letting fall the book, he exclaimed, halfa whip!” So saying, he snatched the crying with grief and vexation : “ There whip from the king's hand, and began, we have it! I knew how it would be ! with more zeal than success, to instruct Did I not say from the first you underhim in the science of whip-cracking: The stood nothing? And what is to be done king, though scarcely able to contain him- now? I can never get them together by selt, tried in right earnest, and at length myself. You must help, that's a fact." succeeded in extracting a tolerably sharp The king consented; the herdboy report from the leathern instrument of placed him at one corner, showed him authority; and the boy, after once more how to move his outstretched arms up trying to impress the duties of his respon- and down, whilst he must shout with all sible office on his temporary substitute, his might; and then the boy himself set VOL. XLIX.-NO. 4

36

out, whip in hand, to gather in the far “Well, look ye now,” said the monarch: thest scattered of the flock.

" I am the king !" The king did his best, and after terrible “ You !” once more reïterated the inexertions, the cackling runaways were dignant goose-herd; “I am not such a flat once more congregated on their allotted as to believe that—not I. So lift up your territory.

book and get along with you.” But now the boy gave free vent to his The king quickly took up his book, sayindignation, rated the king soundly for ing, as he handed four additional zwanzi. neglect, and wound up all by declaring: gers to the astonished lad: "Don't be “Never shall any one get my whip from angry with me, my boy; I give you my me again, or tempt me, with two zwanzi. word, I'll never undertake to herd geese gers, to give up my geese. No; not to again.” the king himself!"

The boy fixed a doubting gaze on the “You are quite right there, my fine mysterious donor of such unexampled fellow,” said the good-natured Maximil-treasure, then added, with a wise shake ian, bursting into a laugh ; "he under- of the head : “ You're a kind gentleman, stands goose-herding quite as little as I do.” | whoever you may be; but you'll never

“And you laugh at it, to the bargain !" make a good goose-herd !” said the boy, in high dudgeon.

From the Edinburgh Review.

CEYLON-ITS ASPECTS, ANTIQUITIES, AND PRODUCTIONS.*

AMIDST the labors of a life devoted to through twenty-three centuries, from 543 the assiduous discharge of public duties, B.C. to the year of Christ 1758. The arts both abroad and at home, Sir Emerson of agriculture were imported into Ceylon Tennent has found means to produce the by the Bengal conquerors, who founded most copious, interesting, and complete the dynasty of Wijayo, five centuries monograph which exists in our language before Christ; in the first centuries of the on any of the possessions of the British Christian era civilization was established, Crown. The island of Ceylon can not, and the population is supposed to have with any strictness or propriety, be termed been ten times what it now is.* Irrigaa colony. It is one of the oldest kingdoms tion by artificial lakes and enormous tanks, of the earth, inhabited by races whose one of which was forty miles in circumorigin is lost in primitive antiquity; traces ference, gave life and fertility to the soil; of the demon worship of fattened serpents and as the modern traveler penetrates by still linger among the superstitions of the forgotten tracts into the recesses of the people; and the lofty pinnacle called forest, he is every where struck by the * Adam's Peak,” which has served for vast and countless excavations and emages as a landmark to the navigators of bankments which attest the industry and the Eastern seas, is still said to bear the ingenuity of a great people. Two thoufootprint of the first created man. The sand years ago the Buddhist faith was chronicles of the island extend, if we may introduced into Ceylon, and the island place implicit reliance on the profound re- soon became one of the chief seats of that searches of Mr. Turnour, the translator of creed, which holds three hundred and fifty the Mahawanso, in an unbroken series millions of human beings in its fetters; the

mystical Bo-tree, which still flourishes in * Ceylon : An Account of the Island, Physical, the holy precincts of Anarajapoora, deHistorical, and Topographical : with Notices of its Natural History, Antiquities, and Productions.

* The population of all races in Ceylon amountIllustrated by Maps, Plans, and Drawings. By Sir ed in 1857 to 1,697,975, besides soldiers and aliens J. Exerson TenneNT. Two vols. 8vo. London. estimated at about 30,000: yet the island is only 1859.

about one sixth smaller than Ireland.

tached from the identical tree under which | abundant, the forests more animated by a Buddha reclined when he received his thousand varieties of life. And Sir Emerinitiation in Uruwela, has already com son Tennent displays a very vivid power pleted its second millennium. By the of transporting his readers into the midst extinction of the ancient dynasties, by the of these scenes, which are so delightful to decline of the population, and by the the imagination, and sometimes so much progress of European enterprise, Ceylon less delightful to actual experience. We has been successively occupied and ruled are extremely well satisfied to visit Ceyby the Portuguese and by the Dutch, lon in Sir Emerson's company, without until it passed at length entirely into the being bitten by land-leeches, snapped at possession of the British Crown. Few by crocodiles, terrified by cobras, or purcountries have a history of equal antiquity, sued by an irritated proboscidian ; and we connected by so many links with the are all the more grateful to our author for great political and religious revolutions the sunshine he has contrived to throw of the world ; uniting, as in an emporium, upon the dark autumnal days of England the commerce and the industry of the by the publication of these volumes. East and of the West, and deriving a Nothing better illustrates the very expeculiar and romantic interest from its tended connection of Ceylon with the difincomparable natural beauty, and its ferent civilizations and powers which have varied natural productions.

succeeded one another for the last two These curious and copious materials had thousand years in the East, than the great remained scattered in an infinite variety variety of appellations by which this celeof repositories, until Sir Emerson Tennent, brated island figures in the annals of dif moved by the interest he felt in the island, ferent countries. In the mythical language in which he then filled a high official sta- of the Brahmins, it bore the name of tion, applied himself to the production of “Lanka,” “the resplendent;" they made the work now before us. We congratu- it the first meridian of their astronomical late him on the success which has attended system; and extolled it as a region of his persevering and conscientious labors, mystery and preternatural beauty. Sir for the result is one of the most satisfac- Emerson is of opinion that Galle, which tory books we have ever had the good became the mart of Portugal and of Holfortune to examine. He has ransacked land, and is now one of the principal renthe bistorical and geographical records of dezvous of British steamers, was the every age and country having reference Tarshish to which the Phænician mariners to his subject, many of them entirely un- and the fleets of Solomon resorted to bring known; thus, in addition to the notices back the gold of Ophir-Ophir being now of Ceylon, which are to be found in Pliny, supposed to be Malacca, the Aurea CherPtolemy, and the Arabian geographers, sonesus of the later Greek geographers. he has succeeded in obtaining, through the Chinese missions, a singular collection

“ The ships intended for the voyage were of documents on the relations of the built by Solomon at 'Ezion-geber on the shores

of the Red Sea,' the rowers coasted along the Singhalese with the court of Pekin; he shores of Arabia and the Persian Gulf

, headed has consulted the little-known works of by an east wind. Tarshish, the port for which Valentyn, De Barros, and De Couto, in they were bound, was in an island, governed by Dutch and Portuguese; he has searched kings, and carrying on an extensive foreign the Indian correspondence of Marquis trade. The voyage occupied three years in Pombal (now in the British Museum) for going and returning from the Red Sea, and the the Portuguese reports and dispatches; cargoes brought home to Ezion-geber consisted and he has succeeded in completing, from Goid could have been shipped at Galle from the

of gold and silver, ivory, apes, and peacocks. Mr. North's letters in the Wellesley vessels which brought it from Ophir, “silver Papers, the particulars of the revolution spread into plates,' which is particularized by which overthrew the house of Kandy. Jeremiah as an export of Tarshish, is one of the The chapters of this work relating to the substances on which the sacred books of the natural history of the island, to which we Singhalese are even now inscribed; itory is shall devote the greater part of the fol. found in Ceylon, and must have been hoth lowing pages, have a still more general

abundant and full grown there before the disinterest. In no part of the tropics is the tion of elephants ; apes are indigenous to the

covery of gunpowder led to the wanton destrucclimate more brilliant, the vegetation more island, and peaforol are found there in numbers. luxuriant, the resources of the soil more! It is very remarkable, too, that the terms by

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Most if not all our readers have heard | my lad: dost think thou could'st find for this proverb applied, when some one has me a book I left lying in such and such a attempted what was out of his province. part of the park? thou'lt get two‘zwanziBut assuredly none of them ever saw it gers'* for bringing it to me.” so royally exemplified as it was in the The boy, who had never before seen true history I am about to relate, the the king, cast a most incredulous look on principal actor in which was no less a per- the corpulent gentleman who made him sonage than Maximilian Joseph of Ba- so astounding a proffer, and then turned varia, the grandfather of the present king away, saying, with an air of comical re. of that country, and one of the most lov- sentment : "I am not so stupid as you ing, as well as one of the most beloved take me for." monarchs, that ever wielded a scepter. “Why do you think I consider you On one hot summer day, King Maximil. stupid ?is asked the monarch. ian, clad in very plain habiliments, had "Because you offer me two zwanzigers gone out alone, (as was his wont,) to walk for so trifling a service; so much money in the fine park which surrounds his castle can not be earned so easily," was the of Tegernue,* and after a time, drew a sturdy reply. volume from his pocket, and seated him “Now, indeed,” said the king, smiling self on a bench to read. The sultriness of good - humoredly, “I must think thee a the air, and the perfect stillness of the simpleton ! why do you thus doubt my place, made his eyes heavy, and laying word ? down his book on the bench beside him, “Those up yonder,” replied the boy, the monarch fell into a doze. His slum- pointing in the direction of the distant ber did not last long, however, and on castle, "are ready enough to make sport awaking, he rose to continue his walk, but of the like of us, and ye’re one of them, forgot his book, and left it lying on the I'm thinking." bench. Wandering onwards, from one “ And suppose I were” said the king; division of the extensive park to another, “but see, here are the two zwanzigers; he at length passed beyond its limits, and take them, and fetch me the book.” entered on those grassy downs which The herd-boy's eyes sparkled as he held stretch down to the margin of the lake. actually in his hand a sum of money near

All at once, the king remembered his ly equal to the hard coin of his summer's book, and the possibility that it might be herding, and yet he hesitated. seen and appropriated by some stranger "How now,” cried the king; "why passing by." Unwilling to lose a book don't you set off at once ?” he valued, and equally unwilling to re “I would fain to do it-but I dare not," trace the way he had come, while the lake said the poor fellow ; "for if the villagers path to the castle lay temptingly before hear I have left the plaguy geese, they him, the king looked round in every di- will turn me off, and how shall I earn my rection, for some one whom he could send bread then ?» for the volume; but the only human be “Simpleton !” exclaimed the king, “I ing within view was a boy, tending a will herd the geese till you return." large flock of geese. The monarch, there “ You !” said the rustic, with a most fore, went up to him, and said: "Hearken, contemptuous elongation of the pronoun;

you would make a pretty goose-herd ;

you are much too fat, and much too stiff: The same romantic residence to which the still suffering King of Prussia resorted last summer. * An Austrian coin, value 7d. or 8d. sterling.

suppose they broke away from you now, ran off at full speed in the direction the and got into the rich meadow yonder, I king had indicated. should have more trespass money to pay

The monarch, who could now indulge than my year's wages come to. Just look in a hearty laugh, sat himself down on a at the Court Gardener there, him with tree-stump which the goose-herd had prethe black head and wings; he is a regular viously occupied, to await the return of deserter, a false knave; he is for all the his messenger. But it really seemed as if world one of the court trash, and they, his feathered charge had discovered that we all know, are good for nothing. He the whip was no longer wielded by their would lead you a fine dance! Nay, nay, accustomed prompt and vigilant com. it would never do."

mander, for the treacherous “Court GarThe king felt ready to burst with sup- dener” suddenly stretched out his long pressed laughter ; but mastering himself, neck, and, after reconnoitring on all sides, asked, with tolerable composure: “Why, uttered two or three shrill screams; upon can 1 not keep geese in order as easily as which, as if a tempest had all at once men? I have plenty of them to control.” rushed under the multitude of wings, the

“You,” again said the boy, sneeringly, whole flock rose simultaneously into the as he measured the monarch from head to air, and before the king could recover foot; "they must be silly ones, then; but from his surprise, they were careering, perhaps you're a schoolmaster? Yet, with loud screams, toward the rich meadeven if ye be, it is much easier to manage ows bordering the lake, over which they boys than geese ; that I can tell ye.” quickly spread themselves in all possible

“ It may be so,” said the king; “but directions. come, make short work of it: will you At the first outburst, the royal herdsbring the book or will you not ?” man called "halt,” with all his might; he

“I would gladly do it," stammered the brandished and tried hard to crack the boy, “but

whip, but extracted no sound which could so I'll be answerable for the geese,” cried intimidate the Court Gardener. He then the king, “and pay all damages, if such ran to and fro, until, teeming with perspithere be."

ration, and yielding to adverse fate, he This decided the question; and so, after reseated himself on the tree-stump, and, exacting a promise that his substitute leaving the geese to their own devices, would pay special attention to the doings quietly awaited the return of his messenger. of the stately gander, whom he designa. "The boy was right, after all," said he ted as the “Court Gardener," and pro- to himself: “it is easier to govern a couple nounced an incorrigible breaker of bounds, of millions of men than a flock of plagay and prime seducer of the flock, he placed geese,' and a court gardener can do a deal the whip in tbe king's hands, and set off of mischief." on his errand.

Meanwhile the boy had reached the But scarcely had he run a few yards bench, found the book, and sped back in when he turned back again.

triumph, little dreaming of the discomfit“ What is the matter now ?” called out ure his substitute had experienced. But the king.

when, on coming close up to the king, he “ Crack the whip,” resounded in return. looked round in vain for his charge, and The monarch swung it with his best effort, still worse, when their vociferous cackling bąt procured no sounding whack. “I led his eyes in the direction of the forbid. thought so !” exclaimed the rustic. “A den meadow, he was so overwhelmed that, schoolmaster, forsooth, and can not crack letting fall the book, he exclaimed, halfa whip!” So saying, he snatched the crying with grief and vexation : “ There whip from the king's hand, and began, we have it! I knew how it would be ! with more zeal than success, to instruct Did I not say from the first you underhim in the science of whip-cracking. The stood nothing? And what is to be done king, though scarcely able to contain him- now? I can never get them together by selt, tried in right earnest, and at length myself. You must help, that's a fact.” succeeded in extracting a tolerably sharp The king consented; the herdboy report from the leathern instrument of placed him at one corner, showed him authority; and the boy, after once more how to move his outstretched arms up trying to impress the duties of his respon- and down, whilst he must shout with all sible office on his temporary substitute, his might; and then the boy himself set

VOL. XLIX.-NO. 4

36

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