History of the United States, from the Earliest Discoveries to the Close of the Great Rebellion, in 1865: Containing, Also, the Constitution of the United States : with Explanatory Notes and Questions

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Ivison, Phinney, Blakeman & Company, 1867 - 459 Seiten
 

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Seite 283 - ... it would be peculiarly improper to omit, in this first official act, my fervent supplications to that Almighty Being, who rules over the universe, who presides in the councils of nations, and whose providential aids can supply every human defect, that his benediction may consecrate to the liberties and happiness of the people of the United States a government instituted by themselves for these essential purposes, and may enable every instrument employed in its administration to execute with success...
Seite 218 - Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston.
Seite 453 - Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the United States ; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of the United States, or of any particular State. SECTION IV. — The United States shall guarantee to every State in...
Seite 450 - From this method of interpreting laws by the reason of them, arises what we call equity, which is thus defined by Grotius : "the correction of that wherein the law (by reason of its universality) is deficient.
Seite 447 - The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice-President shall be the Vice-President. if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of...
Seite 448 - President of the United States, the President of the Senate pro tempore, and in case there shall be no President of the Senate, then the Speaker of the House of Representatives for the time being, shall act as President of the United States, until the disability be removed, or a President shall be elected.
Seite 447 - No person, except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of the United States at the time of the adoption of this constitution, shall be eligible to the office of president: neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of thirty five years, and been fourteen years a resident within the United States.
Seite 437 - Each house shall be the judge of the election,, returns, and qualifications of its own members...
Seite 293 - ... for the preservation of his health. His exterior created in the beholder the idea of strength, united with manly gracefulness. His manners were rather reserved than free, though they partook nothing of that dryness and sternness which accompany reserve when carried to an extreme ; and on all proper occasions he could relax sufficiently to show how highly he was gratified by the charms of conversation, and the pleasures of society. His person and...
Seite 457 - West Virginia, Maine, Kansas, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Missouri, Nevada, Indiana, Louisiana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Vermont, Tennessee, Arkansas, Connecticut, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Alabama, North Carolina, and Georgia. ARTICLE XIV. SECTION 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.

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