Mineral Resources of the United States, Part 2

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1917 - Mineral industries
 

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Page 39 - In the manufacture of fluorides of iron and manganese for steel fluxing and of sodium fluoride for wood preservation' ; in the manufacture of glass, enameled, and sanitary ware, and of hydrofluoric acid ; in the electrolytic refining of antimony and lead ; and in the production of aluminum.
Page 63 - ... the actual market value or wholesale price of such merchandise at the time of exportation to the United States...
Page 576 - Oils from the Gulf field are characterized by relatively high percentages of asphalt and low percentages of the lighter gravity distillation products. Considerable sulphur is present, much of which, however, is in the form of sulphurated hydrogen and is easily removed by steam before refining or utilizing the oil as fuel.
Page 55 - ... considered in other chapters of Mineral Resources. Tripoli and diatomaceous earth are to a large extent consumed as abrasives and are considered in the chapter on abrasive materials. , USES. Silica (quartz) as discussed in this chapter is used for many purposes, principally in the manufacture of pottery, paints, and scouring soaps, as a wood filler, as a polisher, and in metallurgical and chemical processes. In the pottery industry, where it is generally called flint, silica is used in the body...
Page 365 - ... by small steam shovels. Opposition to shooting from the solid has developed, because it is injurious to the mining property in that the unusual charges of powder weaken the roof and pillars, which increases the liability to falls of roof and coal, the most prolific cause of fatal accidents to coal miners. Another objection to this method is that the heavy charges of powder required to blow down the coal where it has not been previously undercut or sheared, result in the production of a much higher...
Page 469 - States bounded on the west by the northern and western shore of Lake Michigan to Chicago, thence by a line to Peoria, thence to East St. Louis, thence down the Mississippi River to the mouth of the Ohio River, and on the south by the Ohio River from its mouth to Parkersburg, W. Va.; thence by a line to the southwestern corner of Maryland; thence by the Potomac River to its mouth.
Page 978 - ... operating costs. The absorption process of extracting gasoline from natural gas assumed industrial importance as the demand for gasoline increased. The scheme is practically identical with the process of extracting benzole and toluol, (light oil) from coke oven gases.
Page 245 - Act, or to sell, charge for, or purport to deliver from any State or Territory or the District of Columbia to any other State or Territory or the District of Columbia, as a large or small barrel or a fractional part of said small barrel of lime, any less weight of lime than is established...
Page 245 - That it shall be unlawful to pack, sell, or offer for sale for shipment from any State or Territory or the District of Columbia to any other State or Territory or the District of Columbia, any barrels or other containers...
Page 46 - ... ^'The requirements of the pottery trade demand that in general the percentage of free quartz associated with the feldspar used for this purpose shall not exceed 20 per cent in the ground product, and certain potters demand a spar which is nearly pure, containing probably less than 5 per cent of free quartz. In order to be profitably worked in most feldspar mines between one-fourth and one-half of the total material that must be excavated should contain less than 20 per cent of free quartz. Freshness...

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