Transactions of The Indiana State Medical Association, Ausgabe 34

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Seite 283 - ... which it may be thought proper to express But no statement or discussion of it should take place before the patient or his friends, except in the presence of all the faculty attending, and by their common consent ; and no opinions or prognostications should be delivered, which are not the result of previous deliberation and concurrence.
Seite 279 - ... he should always bear in mind that a medical man is under the strongest obligations of secrecy. Even the female sex should never allow feelings of shame or delicacy to prevent their disclosing the seat, symptoms and causes of complaints peculiar to them. However commendable a modest reserve may be in the common occurrences of life, its strict observance in medicine is often attended with the most serious consequences...
Seite 280 - ... to exalt its standing, and to extend the bounds of its usefulness. He should, therefore, observe strictly, such laws as are instituted for the government of its members; should avoid all contumelious and sarcastic remarks relative to the faculty, as a body ; and while, by unwearied diligence, he resorts to every honorable means of enriching the science, he should entertain a due respect for his seniors, who have, by their labors, brought it to the elevated condition in which he finds it.
Seite 282 - ... exercise of this fraternal courtesy, without awarding to the physician who officiates the fees arising from the discharge of his professional duties. In obstetrical and important surgical cases, which give rise to unusual fatigue, anxiety and responsibility, it is just that the fees accruing therefrom should be awarded to the physician who officiates.
Seite 287 - Poverty, professional brotherhood, and certain of the public duties referred to in the first section of this article, should always be recognized as presenting valid claims for gratuitous services ; but neither institutions endowed by the public or by rich individuals, societies for mutual benefit, for the insurance of lives or for analogous purposes, nor any profession or occupation, can be admitted to possess such privilege.
Seite 281 - All practitioners of medicine, their wives, and their children while under the paternal care, are entitled to the gratuitous services of any one or more of the faculty residing near them, whose assistance may be desired.
Seite 278 - To decline attendance, under such circumstances, would be sacrificing to fanciful delicacy, and mistaken liberality, that moral duty, which is independent of, and far superior to, all pecuniary consideration. 6. Consultations should be promoted in difficult or protracted cases, as they give rise to confidence, energy, and more enlarged views in practice.
Seite 287 - ... Medical men should also be always ready, when called on by the legally constituted authorities, to enlighten coroners' inquests, and courts of justice, on subjects strictly medical — such as involve questions relating to sanity, legitimacy, murder by poisons or other violent means, and in regard to the various other subjects embraced in the science of medical jurisprudence. But in these cases, and especially where they are required to make a...
Seite 279 - The obedience of a patient to the prescriptions of his physician should be prompt and implicit. He should never permit his own crude opinions as to their fitness to influence his attention to them. A failure in one particular may render an otherwise judicious treatment dangerous, and even fatal. This remark is equally applicable to diet, drink, and exercise. As patients become convalescent, they are very apt to suppose that the rules prescribed for them vany be disregarded, and the consequence, but...
Seite 278 - A physician should not be forward to make gloomy prognostications, because they savor of empiricism, by magnifying the importance of his services in the treatment or cure of the disease. But he should not fail, on proper occasions, to give to the friends of the patient timely notice of danger when it really occurs; and even to the patient himself, if absolutely necessary.

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