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in. Wie se cae bancos, I: ITGinse 12cc of ass creo Piges. P:f. Aad is Fred 2. ese enca,

Hos Fass, Tarlet Te,
His crea prore, his gcits ho!!,

Acis ictt cooch deze. Ms. My handgr fail nor cool: I will inceaie Page to deal with porta; I will pokeis hin with yel owners, for tre revoit of mien ? is dangerous: that is my true hamour.

Pif. Thou art the Mars of malecontents: I second thee; troop on.

(Exeunt. SCENE IV.

A Room in Dr. Caius's Hal. Enter Mrs. QUICKLY, SIMPLE, and RUGBY. Quick. What; John Rugby!-I pray thee, go to the calement, and see if you can see my maiter, master Doctor

4 -- in my head,] These words, which are omitted in the folio, were recovered by Mr. Pope from the early quarto. MALONE.

5 I will discuss tbe bumour of this love to Page.) The folio reads to Ford; and in the next line and I to Page, &c. But the reverse of this (as Mr. Steevens has observed) happens in A&. II. where Nym makes the discovery to Page, and Pistol to Ford. I have therefore corrected the text from the old quarto, where Nym declares he will make the discovery to Page; and Pistol says, “ And 1 to Ford will like. wife tell," MALONE.

- yellownejso] Yellowness is jealousy. JOHNSON. 7 - ibe revole of mien-) is change of countenance; one of the effects he has been just ascribing to jealousy. STEEVENS.

Nym means, I think, to say, that kind of change in tbe complexios, which is caused by jealousy, renders the perfon pollefled by such a paffior dangerous; confequently Ford will be likely to revenge himself on Falstaff, and I shall be gratified. I believe our author wrote bat revolt &c. though I have not disturbed the text. ye and ye in the Mrs. of his time were calily confounded. MALONE.

Caius, coming: if he do, i'faith, and find any body in the house, here will be an old abusing of God's patience, and the king's English. Rug. I'll go watch.

[Exit RUGBY. Quick. Go; and we'll have a posset for't soon at night, in faith, at the latter end of a fea-coal fires. An honest, willing, kind fellow, as ever servant shall come in house withal; and, I warrant you, no tell-tale, nor no breedbates his worst fault is, that he is given to prayer ; he is something peevish 1 that way: but nobody but has his fault;—but let that pass. Peter Simple, you say your name is ?

Sim. Ay, for fault of a better.
Quick. And master Slender's your master?
Sim. Ay, forsooth.

Quick. Does he not wear a great round beard, like a glover's paring knife *?

Sim. No, forsooth: he hath but a little wee face ?, with a little yellow beard; a Cain-colour'd beard 3. Quick. A softly-sprighted man, is he not?

- at sbe latter end of a sea.coal fire.] That is, when my master is in bed. JOHNSON.

9 - no breed-bate : ] Bate is an obsolete word, signifying strife, contention. STEEVENS. Impeevish-] Peevish is foolish. So in Cymbeline, Act II:

“ – he's strange and peevish.. STIEVENS. I believe, this is one of dame Quckly's blunders, and that she means precise. MALONE.

- a great round beard, &c.] See a note on K. Henry V. Act. III. sc. vi : “ And what a beard of the general's cut, &c." MALONE.

2 - a little wee face,] Wee, in the northern dialect, fignifies very little. COLLINS.

On the authority of the quarto, 1619, we might be led to read wbey face: “- somewhat of a weakly man, and has as it were a wbey coloured beard." Macbeth calls one of the messengers wbey-face. STEEV.

3 —a Cain.colour'd beard.] Cain and Judas, in the tapestries and pictures of old, were represented with yellow beards. THEOBAI. D.

In an age, when but a small part of the nation could read, ideas were frequently borrowed from representations in painting or tapestry. A cane-colour'd beard however, (the reading of the quarto, ) might fignify a beard of the colour of cane, i. e. a fickly yellow; for Jiraw-coloured beards are mentioned in the Midsummer Nigbr's Dream. STEEVENS. The words of the quarto,

-a whey-colour'd beard, strongly favour this reading; for wbey and cane are nearly of the same colour. MALONE.

Sim.

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Sim. Ay, forsooth: but he is as tall a man of his hands, as any is between this and his head; he hath fought with a warrener.

Quick. How say you ?-0, I should remember him; Does he not hold up his head, as it were ? and strut in his gait?

Sim. Yes, indeed, does he.

Quick. Well, heaven send Anne Page no worse fortune! Tell master parson Evans, I will do what I can for your master: Anne is a good girl, and I wih

Re-enter RUGBY.
Rug. Out, alas! here comes my master.

Quick. We shall all be thents: Run in here, good young man; go into this closet. [Shuts Simple in the closet.] He will not stay long.---What, John Rugby! John, what, John, I say! —Go, John, go enquire for my master; I doubt, he be not well, that he comes not home:-and down, down, adown-a", &c.

[Sings. Enter Doctor CAIUS?. Caius. Vat is you fing? I do not like defe toys; Pray

you, 4- as tall a man of bis hands,] Perhaps this is an allufion to the jocky measure, so many bards bigt, used by grooms when speaking of horses. Tall, in our author's time, signified not only height of stature, but stoutness of body. The ambiguity of the phrase seems intended.

PERCY. Whatever may be the origin of this phrase, it is very ancient, being used by Gower. De Confessione Amantis, lib. v, fol. 118. b.

“ A worthie knight was of bis bonde,

" There was none such in all the londe." STEEVENS. Dr. Percy's account of the origin of this phrase can hardly be juft; for “ a proper man of his hands” was likewise a phrase of our author's age; and that cannot allude to the meafure of horses. MALONE. 5 -- we shall all be ment :]i. e. fcolded, roughly treated. STEVENS,

- and down, down, adown-a, &c.] To deceive her maiter, the fings as if at her work. Sir J. HAWKINS.

This appears to have been the burden of some song then well known. In Every woman in ber Humour, 1609, fign. E. 1. one of the characters says, “ Hey, good boyes i'faith; now a threemans song, or the old downe adowne i well, things must be as they may; &c." REED.

; Enter Doctor Caius.] Dr. John Caius was a celebrated physician

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you, go and vetch me in my closet un boitier verds ; a box, a green-a box; Do intend vat I speak? a green-a box.

Quick. Ay, forsooth, I'll fetch it you. I am glad he went not in himself: if he had found the young man, he would have been horn-mad.

[ Aside. Caius. Fe, fe, fe, fe! ma foi, il fait fort chaud. m'en vais à la Cour,-la grande affaire.

Quick. Is it this, Sir.

Caius. Ouy ; mette le au mon pocket; Depeche, quickly:-Vere is dat knave Rugby?

Quick. What, John Rugby! John!
Rug. Here, Sir.

Caius. You are John Rugby, and you are Jack Rugby : Come, take-a your rapier, and come after my heel to de court,

Rug. 'Tis ready, Sir, here in the porch.
Caius. By my trot, I tarry too long :-

Od's me! Qu'ai j'oublié ? dere is some simples in my closet, dat 1 vill not for the varld I shall leave behind.

Quick. Ah me! he'll find the young man there, and be mad.

Caius. O diable, diable! vat is in my closet ? - Villainy! laron! (pulling Simple out.] Rugby, my rapier. in the time of Queen Elizabeth, and founder of Caius college, in Cambridge. He was born in 1510, and died in 1567: He is said to have written a great part of Grafton's Chronicle. MALONE.

It has been thoughe strange, that our author should take the name of Caius for his Frenchman in this comedy; but Shakspeare was little acquainted with literary history; and without doubt, from his unusual name, supposed him to have been a forcign quack. Add to this, that the doctor was handed down as a kind of Rosicrucian: Mr. Ames had in Mr. one of the secret Writings of Dr. Caius.” FARMER.

This character of Dr. Caius might have been drawn from the life ; as in Jacke of Dover's Quest of Enquirie, 1604, (perhaps a republication) a story called the Foole of Winsor begins thus : “ Upon a time there was in Wirfor a certaine simple outlandishe doctor of pbyficke, belonging to the deane, &c." STEEVENS.

- un boitier verd;] Boitier in French signifies a case of surgeons inftruments. GREY.

I believe it rather means a box of salve, or cafe to hold simples, for which Caius profesies to seek. STEEVENS.

Quick.

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Mrs. Pare. And, trs, I =as cosing to you. You La Seti

Lir:. Furé. Nay, I'll ne'ez betere tha: ; I Lave to J'ir:. Page. 'rala, but you do, is ay nind.

Mrs. Ferd. Wel, I do tien; yet, I say, I coc!dites you to the contrary: 0, mitreis Page give me some Wuniel!

Mrs. Page. What's the matter, woman?

Mrs. Ford. O woman, if it were not for one triding respect, I could come to such honour!

Mrs. Page. Hang the trifle, woman; take the honoar: What is it i-dispense with trifles ;-what is it?

Mrs. Ford. If I would but go to hell for an eternal moment, or so, I could be knighted.

4 - for the putting down of fat men.] The word far, which frems to have been inadvertently omitted in the folio, was reitored by Mr. 'I heobald from the quarto, where the corresponding speech runs thur: “ Well, I thall truít fat men the worse, while I live, for his szke. O God, that I knew how to be revenged of him !”—Dr. Johnson, however, thinks that the insertion is unnecessary, as “

Mrs. Page might naturally enough, in the first heat of her anger, rail at the sex for the fault of one." But the authority of the original sketch in quarto, and Mrs. Page's frequent mention of the fize of her lover in the play as it now Itands, in my opinion fully warrant the correction that has been made, Our author well knew that bills are brought into parliament for lume purpose that at least appears prałticable. Mrs. Page therefore in ber pallion might exhibit a bill for the putting down or destroying men of a particular description; but Shakspeare would never have made her threaten to introduce a bill to effect an impossibility; viz. the extermination of the whole species.

There is no crior more frequent at the press than the omiffion of words. In a theet of this work now before me, there was an out, (as it is termed in the printing-house,) that is, a passage omitted, of no less than ten lines. In every theet some words are at first omitted.

The exprellion, putting down, is a common phrase of our municipal law. MALONI.

Mrs.

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