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allées ? 8. Elles s'en sont allées vers six heures de l'après- Vous faut-il cinquante francs ? Do you want or must you have fifty midi. 9. L'habit que vous tenez, est-il à vous ou à votre frère ?

francs? 10. Il n'est ni à lui ni à moi, il est à mon beau-frère. 11. Lui Il me faut cinquante-cinq francs. I must have or I need fifty-five france. va-t-il bien ? 12. Il lui va fort bien, et il lui sied bien. 13. Combien de argent faut-il à votre How much money does your father Où l'a-t-il fait faire ? 14. Il l'a fait faire en France ou en

père ?

want ! Il lui en faut beaucoup.

He wants much (of it). Allemagne. 15. À qui sont les livres que lit Mademoiselle Nous avons ce qu'il (R.3) nous fant. We have what we want. votre scur? 16. Ils sont à moi. 17. Votre gilet va-t-il mieux que celui de votre beau-frère ? 18. Il me va beaucoup mieux.

VOCABULARY. 19. Votre habit ne vous gêne-t-il pas ? 20. Il ne saurait (cannot) Aller trouver, to go to | Désir-er, 1, to wish, to Main de papier, f., a

desire. me gêner, il est de beaucoup trop large. 21. Avez-vous essayé

a person.

quire of paper.

Centime, m., votre habit neuf ? 22. Je l'ai essayé, mais la couleur ne me

100th part Dette, f., debt.

Modiste, milliner. of a franc.

Envoy-er, 1, ir. [$ 49 Ouvrage, m., worl. sied pas. 23. Est-elle trop claire ? 24. Elle est trop foncée.

Chirurgien, m.,surgeon, (2)], to send.

Payer, 1, pec. [549 25. Les couleurs foncées ne me siéent jamais.

Combien, how much, Fin.ir, 2, to finish.

(2)], to pay. EXERCISE 88.

how many.

Fort, very, very much. Peine, 1., trouble. Davantage, more.

Quand, when. 1. Are your friends gone away? 2. They are not yet gone away, they are still here. 3. At what hour did your mother

EXERCISE 89. go away? 4. She went away early this morning. 5. Did your 1. Que faut-il faire aujourd'hui ? 2. Aujourd'hui il faut little sister go away late? 6. She went away too soon. 7. travailler. 3. A-t-il fallu travailler fort pour finir l'ouvrage à Does your sister's new dress become her? 8. It does not temps ? 4. Il a fallu travailler toute la journée. 5. Quand become her. 9. Why does it not become her? 10. Dark faut-il écrire à notre ami ? 6. Il faut lui écrire aujourd'hui. colours never become her. 11. Do light colours become your 7. Me faut-il aller trouver mon père ? 8. Il vous faut aller le brother's wife? 12. They become her very well. 13. Are trouver, il désire vous parler. 9. A-t-il besoin de quelque your new boots too narrow or too wide ? 14. They are neither chose ? 10. n lui faut des livres, des plumes, et de l'encre. too narrow nor too wide, they fit very well. 15. Does your 11. Ne lui faut-il pas aussi de l'argent? 12. Il lui en fant brother's waistcoat fit him? 16. It fits him, but it does not beaucoup pour payer ces dettes. 13. Vous faut-il encore quelque become him. 17. Light colours never become him. 18. Does chose? 14. Il ne me faut plus rien, j'ai tout ce qu'il me fant. your coat press you ? 19. It does not press me, it is by far too 15. Ne faut-il pas du papier à votre scur? 16. Il ne lui wide. 20. Whose house is that? 21. It is my father's and en fant pas davantage.* 17. Que faut-il envoyer an chirurbrother's. 22. Whose books have you brought this morning ? gien ? 18. Il faut lui envoyer de l'argent, il en a grand besoin. 23. I have brought my brother's and my sister's. 24. Whose 19. La modiste a-t-elle tout ce qu'il lui faut ? 20. Elle n'a pas dresses are those ? 25. They are my mother's, my sister's, and tout ce qu'il lui faut. 21. Combien vous faut-il ? 22. Il me my cousin's. 26. Are not those German books yours? 27. They faut cinq francs. 23. Ne vous faut-il pas davantage ? 24. I are not mine, they are my friend's. 28. Are those pens yours or ne me faut pas davantage. 25. Que lui faut-il pour sa peine ? mine? 29. They are neither yours nor ine, they are my 26. Il demande un franc vingt-cinq centimes. brother's. 30. Does this hat fit you ? 31. Yes, Sir, it fits me,

EXERCISE 90. but it does not become me. 32. Is your hat too small ? 33. It is too large. 34. Are your gloves too large ? 35. They are too learn your lesson. 3. Is it necessary to write to your brother

1. What must we do? 2. You must bring your book and small, I cannot put them on.

to-day? 4. It is not necessary to write to him. 5. Has it SECTION XLVII. --UNIPERSONAL VERBS AND THEIR USES. been necessary to speak to your father? 6. It has been neces. 1. The verb falloir [3, ir.], to be necessary, is always conjugated sary to speak to him. 7. Is it necessary to go to D. to-day? unipersonally. See table, $ 62.

8. It is necessary to go there (y). 9. Must I go to your sister? Il faut, il a fallu,

10. You must go to her, she wishes to speak to yon. 11. How It is necessary, it was or has been

much money must your brother have ? 12. He must have ten Il faut étudier tout les jours, It is necessary to study every day.

francs fifty centimes. 13. How many books does your sister 2. As falloir has always a unipersonal pronoun for its nomi- 15. What will you send to the surgeon ? 16. We must send

want ? 14. She must have many books, she reads (lit) much. native or subject, a pronoun in the indirect regimen (dativeme, te, lui, nous, vous, leur), placed before the verb, will be him our horse ; his own (le sien) is sick. 17. Must he not have equivalent to the pronoun used as nominative to the English paper ? 18. He must have some; he has letters to write. 19.

Must he have much ? 20. He must have a quire. 21. Do you verbs must, to be obliged, etc.

want anything more? [See No. 13, in the French exercise above.] Il me faut écrire un thème, I must write an exercise.

22. I need something more. 23. I need nothing more. 24. Où nous faut-il aller ? Where must we go ?

Must you have one hundred francs ? 25. I must have ten 3. Falloir is used in the signification of to want, to need, to be dollars. 26. What does the surgeon want? 27. He must have under the necessity of having.

money to (pour) pay his debts. 28. Has the tailor all that he Il me faut un livre, I need a book.

wants ? 29. He has not all that he wants. 30. The milliner Il lui faut de l'argent, He is in want of money.

has received all that she wants. 31. What must you have for 4. When must is used in the last acceptation, and has a noun your trouble ? 32. How much do you want? 33. How much as its nominative, the noun in the corresponding French sentence do we want? 34. What must I do? 35. You must write a should be in the indirect regimen preceded by d.

letter. 36. What must she write ? 37. She must write four

pages. 38. She must go to church. 'Il faut un livre à ma sœur, My sister must have a book (needs a

book). RÉSUMÉ OF EXAMPLES.

READING AND ELOCUTION.—XIII. Pour apprendre une langue il faut To learn a language it is necessary to

ANALYSIS OF THE VOICE (continued), étudier.

study. Il faut aller à l'église et à l'école. It is necessary to go to church and to

VIII.-CORRECT INFLECTION (continued. school. Il faut rester à la maison. It is necessary to remain at home.

Both inflections, the Rising and the Falling, in connection. Il me faut lire un bon livre.* I must read a good book.

Rule 1.---When negation is opposed to affirination, the former Il lui faut aller voir sa mère. She must go and see her mother, has the rising, the latter the falling inflection, in whatever order Que nous faut-il faire ? What must we do ?

they occur, and whether in the same or in different sentences, Que leur faut-il lire ?

What must they read ?
Que leur faut-il?

What do they want or need?
Il leur faut de l'argent ou du They need or must have money or

He did not call me, but yon.
crédit.
credit.

He was esteemed not for wéalth, but for wisdom.

Study not for amusement, but for improvement. * Another construction of these sentences will be found in Sect. XXI. 1, 2.

• This adverb can never be placed before a substantive.

necessary.

enco

He called you, not mé.

Rule on the Monotone. He was esteemed for wisdom, not for wéalth.

The tones of grand and sublime description, profound reverStudy for improvement, not for amúsement.

This proposal is not a mere dle cómpliment. It proceeds from the or awe, of amazement and horror, are marked by the sincerest and deepest feelings of our hearts.

monotone, or perfect level of voice. Howard visited all Europe, not to survey the sumptuousness of Note.-A monotone is always on a lower pitch than the prepalaces, or the stateliness of témples; not to make accurate measure- ceding part of a sentence; and to give the greater effect to its ments of the remains of ancient grandeur; not to form a scale of the deep solemn note-which resembles the tolling of a heavy bell curiosities of modern árt; not to collect medals or collate manuscripts ; -it sometimes destroys all comma pauses, and keeps up one bat to dive into the depths of dùngeons; to plunge into the infection continuous stream of overflowing sound, as :of hospitals; to survey the mansions of sorrow and påin; to take the gauge and dimensions of misery, depression, and contempt; to remem

His form had not yet lost ber the forgòtten, to attend to the neglècted, to visit the forsáken,

All her original brightness, nor appeared and to compare and collate the distresses of all men in all countries.

Less than archangel ruined, and the excess Note.-A similar principle applies to the reading of conces

Of glory obscured. As when the sun, new-risen, sions and of unequal antitheses or contrasts. In the latter,

Lõoks through the horizontal misty air,

Shorn of his béams, or from behind the moon, the less important member has the rising, and the preponderant

In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight shēds one the falling inflection, in whatever part of a sentence they

On half the nations, and with fear of change occur, and even in separate sentences, as :

Perplexes monarchs. Science may raise you to éminence. But virtue alone can guide you And I saw a grēat white throne and Him that sāt on it, from whose to happiness.

fãce the hēavens and the earth flēd awāy; and there was found no place I rather choose

for them.
To wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you,

Upon my secure hour thy uncle stole,
Than I will wrong such hónourable men.

With juice of cürsed hébenon in a vial,

And in the porches of mine èars did pour Erception. When negation is emphatic or preponderant, it

The lëperous distilment; whose effect takes the falling inflection, as :

Hölds such an enmity with blood of mãn, He may yield to persuasion, but he will never submit to fòrce.

That swift as quicksilver it courses through

The natural gates and alleys of the body, We are troubled on every síde, yet not distressed; perplexed, but

And, with a sudden vigour, it doth posset not in despair; pérsecuted, but not forsaken; cast dówn, but not destroyed.

And curd, like éager dröppings into milk,

The thin and wholesome blood ; sõ did it mine; Rule 2.-In question and answer, the falling inflection ends

And a most instant tētter bárked about, as far below the average level of the sentence, as the rising ends

Most lāzar-like, with vile and loathsome crūst, above it. In this way, a certain exact correspondence of sound

All my smooth body. to sound, in the inflections, is produced, which gives to the full

Rule on Harmonic" Inflections. downward slide of the answer a decisive and satisfactory intona

“Harmonic" inflections-or those which, in emphatic phrases, tion, as a reply to the rising slide of the question, as :

are intended to prevent the frequent occurrence of emphasis in Are they Hébrews P-So am 'I. Are they 'Israelites P-So am I. the same phrase from becoming monotonous to the ear-are

What would content you, in a political leader ?–Tálent? No! - applied in clauses of which every word is emphatic, and are 'Enterprise ? No!-Courage? Nò!-Reputátion? Nò !_*Virtue ? marked by a distinct and separate inflection, as :No – The man whom you would select, should possess not one, but all of these.

He has been guilty of one of the most shameful acts || that ever de.

gràded | the n'ATURE || or the NA'ME || of x'an. Rule 3.-When a question consists of two contrasted parts, connected in syntax by the conjunction or, used in a disjunctive

Note.—In such cases the inflections usually alternate, in order sense, the former has the rising, and the latter the falling in to give the more vivid and pungent force to vehement emphasis. fection, as :

Rule on Repeated Words, Phrases, and Sentences. Does he mean you, or me ?

Words, phrases, and sentences which are repeated for effect, Is this book yours, or mine ?

rise higher, or fall lower in inflection, besides increasing in force, Did you see him, or his brother?

at every repetition. Are the people virtuous, or vìcious; intelligent, or ignorant; áffluent,

From these walls a spirit shall go forth, that shall survive when this or indigent?"

edifice shall be, "like an unsubstantial pageant, faded.”

It shall go Note.—When or is used conjunctively, the second inflection fórth, exulting in, but not abusing, its strength. It shall go forth, does not fall, but rises higher than the first, as :

remembering, in the days of its prosperity, the pledges it gave in the

time of its depression. IT SHALL GO FO'RTH, uniting a disposition to Would the influence of the Bible-even if it were not the record of correct abuses, to redress grievances. IT SHALL GO FOʻRTH, uniting a divine revelation-be to render princes more tyránnical, or subjects the disposition to improve, with the resolution to maintain and defend, more ungovernable; the rich more insolent, or the poor more dis- by that spirit of unbought affection, which is the chief defence of orderly; would it make worse párents or children-húsbands or wives nations. -másters or sérvantsfriends or neighbours ? Ort would it not What was it, fellow-citizens, which gave to Lafayette his spotless make med more virtuous, and conse ently more happy, in every fame?-The love of liberty. What has consecrated his memory in the situation ?

hearts of good men ?-THE LOVE OF LIBERTY. Wbat nerved his youthRule on the Circumflex, or Wave.

ful arm with strength, and inspired him in the morning of his days

with sagacity and counsel?-THE LIVING LOVE OF LIBERTY. The circumflex, or wave, applies to all expressions used in a To what did he sacrifice power, and rank, and country, and freedom peculiar sense, or with a double meaning, and to the tones of itself ?-TO THE LOVE OF LIBERTY PROTECTED BY LAW. mockery, sarcasm, and irony, as :

You may avoid a quarrel with an if. . Your if is the only Peacemaker: much virtue in an if.

LESSONS IN PENMANSHIP.-XXVI. From the very first night--and to say it I am bold

With this lesson, which is accompanied by copy-slips headed I've been so very hot, that I'm sure I've caught cold! by the remaining capital letters of the writing alphabet, from Go hang a calfskin on these recreant limbs !

S to Z, we complete our elementary series of Lessons in Pen. What a beautiful piece of work you have made by your carelessness! manship, having enabled the self-teacher, by an easy and careThe weights had never been accused of light conduct.

fully graduated succession of steps, to advance from the formation

of the first elementary stroke that enters into the composition * In successive questions, the rising inflection becomes higher at

of the small letters, to writing sentences in which are to be every stage, tinless the last hus, as in the above example, the falling found capital letters and figures, as well as small letters. We inflection of consummating emphasis.

have now dons as much for him as it is possible to do by verbal + The last or is used disjunctively, and forms an example to the instruction, and it remains for the lcarner to acquire an easy, Rule, and not to the Note.

flowing style of writing, and facility and rapidity in the use of allées ? 8. Elles s'en sont allées vers six heures de l'après-Vous faut-il cinquante francs ? Do you want or must you have fifty midi. 9. L'habit que vous tenez, est-il à vous ou à votre frère ?

francs ? 10. Il n'est ni à lui ni à moi, il est à mon beau-frère. 11. Lui Il me faut cinquante-cinq francs. I must have or I need fifty-five francs. va-t-il bien ? 12. Il lui va fort bien, et il lui sied bien. 13. Combien de argent faut-il à votre How much money does your father Où l'a-t-il fait faire ?

want?
14. Il l'a fait faire en France ou en

père ?
Il lui en faut beaucoup.

He wants much (of it). Allemagne. 15. À qui sont les livres que lit Mademoiselle Nous avons ce qu'il(R.S] nous faut. We have what we want. votre smur? 16. Ils sont à moi. 17. Votre gilet va-t-il mieux

VOCABULARY. que celui de votre beau-frère ? 18. Il me va beaucoup mieux. 19. Votre habit ne vous gêne-t-il pas ? 20. Il ne saurait (cannot) Aller trouver, to go to Désir-er, 1, to wish, to Main de papier, f., a me gêner, il est de beaucoup trop large. 21. Avez-vous essayé

a person.
desire.

quire of prper. votre habit neuf ? 22. Je l'ai essayé, mais la couleur ne me

Centime, m., 100th part Dette, f., debt.

Modiste, millinst. of a franc.

Envoy-er, 1, ir. [$ 49 Ouvrage, m., work. sied pas. 23. Est-elle trop claire ? 24. Elle est trop foncée.

Chirurgien, m.,surgeon. (2)], to send.

Payer, 1, pec. ($ 49 25. Les couleurs foncées ne me siéent jamais.

Combion, how much, Fin-ir, 2, to finish.

(2)], to pay. EXERCISE 88.

how many.

Fort, very, very much. Peine, f., trouble. Davantage, more.

Quand, when. 1. Are your friends gone away? 2. They are not yet gone away, they are still here. 3. At what hour did your mother

EXERCISE 89. go away? 4. She went away early this morning. 5. Did your 1. Que faut-il faire aujourd'hui ? 2. Anjourd'hui il faut little sister go away late ? 6. She went away too soon. 7. travailler. 3. A-t-il fallu travailler fort pour finir l'ouvrage à Does your sister's new dress become her? 8. It does not temps ? 4. Il a fallu travailler toute la journée. 5. Quand become her. 9. Why does it not become her? 10. Dark faut-il écrire à notre ami ? 6. Il faut lui écrire aujourd'hui. colours never become her. 11. Do light colours become your 7. Me faut-il aller trouver mon père ? 8. n vons faut aller le brother's wife ? 12. They become her very well. 13. Are trouver, il désire vous parler. 9. A-t-il besoin de quelque your new boots too narrow or too wide ? 14. They are neither chose ? 10. Il lui faut des livres, des plumes, et de l'encre. too narrow nor too wide, they fit very well. 15. Does your 11. Ne lui faut-il pas aussi de l'argent ? 12. Il lui en faut brother's waistcoat fit him? 16. It fits him, but it does not beaucoup pour payer ces dettes. 13. Vous faut-il encore quelque become him. 17. Light colours never become him. 18. Does chose ? 14. Il ne me faut plus rien, j'ai tout ce qu'il me fant. your coat press you ? 19. It does not press me, it is by far too 15. Ne faut-il pas du papier à votre scur? 16. I ne lui wide. 20. Whose house is that? 21. It is my father's and en faut pas davantage.* 17. Que faut-il envoyer au chirurbrother's. 22. Whose books have you brought this morning ? gien ? 18. Il faut lui envoyer de l'argent, il en a grand besoin. 23. I have brought my brother's and my sister's. 24. Whose 19. La modiste a-t-elle tout ce qu'il lui faut? 20. Elle n'a pas dresses are those ? 25. They are my mother's, my sister's, and tout ce qu'il lui faut. 21. Combien vous faut-il ? 22. Il me my cousin's. 26. Are not those German books yours? 27. They faut cinq francs. 23. Ne vous faut-il pas davantage ? 24. Il are not mine, they are my friend's. 28. Are those pens yours or ne me faut pas davantage. 25. Que lui faut-il pour sa peine ? mine? 29. They are neither yours nor mine, they are my 26. I demande un franc vingt-cinq centimes. brother's. 30. Does this hat fit you ? 31. Yes, Sir, it fits me,

EXERCISE 90. but it does not become me. 32. Is your hat too small ? 33. It is too large. 34. Are your gloves too large ? 35. They are too

1. What must we do? 2. You must bring your book and small, I cannot put them on.

learn your lesson. 3. Is it necessary to write to your brother

to-day? 4. It is not necessary to write to him. 5. Has it SECTION XLVII.--UNIPERSONAL VERBS AND THEIR USES. been necessary to speak to your father ? 6. It has been neces1. The verb falloir [3, ir.), to be necessary, is always conjugated sary to speak to him. 7. Is it necessary to go to D. to-day? unipersonally. See table, $ 62.

8. It is necessary to go there (y). 9. Must I go to your sister? Il faut, il a fallu, It is necessary, it was or has been 10. You must go to her, she wishes to speak to you. 11. How

much money must your brother have? 12. He must have ten Il faut étudier tout les jours, It is necessary to study every day.

francs fifty centimes. 13. How many books does your sister 2. As falloir has always a unipersonal pronoun for its nomi- 15. What will you send to the surgeon? 16. We must send

want ? 14. She must have many books, she reads (lit) much. native or subject, a pronoun in the indirect regimen (dativeme, te, lui, nous, vous, leur), placed before the verb, will be him our horse ; his own (le sien) is sick. 17. Must he not have equivalent to the pronoun used as nominative to the English Must he have much? 20. He must have a quire. 21. Do you

paper? 18. He must have some; he has letters to write. 19. verbs must, to be obliged, etc.

want anything more? [See No. 13, in the French exercise above.] Il me faut écrire un thème, I must write an exercise.

22. I need something more. 23. I need nothing more. 24. Où nous faut-il aller ? Where must we go ?

Must you have one hundred francs ? 25. I must have ten 3. Falloir is used in the signification of to want, to need, to be dollars. 26. What does the surgeon want? 27. He must have under the necessity of having.

money to (pour) pay his debts. 28. Has the tailor all that he Il me faut un livre, I need a book.

wants ? 29. He has not all that he wants. 30. The milliner Il lui faut de l'argent, He is in vant of money.

has received all that she wants. 31. What must you have for 4. When must is used in the last acceptation, and has a noun your trouble ? 32. How much do you want? 33. How much as its nominative, the noun in the corresponding French sentence do we want? 34. What must I do? 35. You must write a should be in the indirect regimen preceded by d.

letter. 36. What must she write? 37. She must write four

pages. 38. She must go to church. Il faut un livre à ma sour, My sister must have a book (needs a

book). RÉSUMÉ OF EXAMPLES.

READING AND ELOCUTION.—XIII. Pour apprendre une langue il faut To learn a language it is necessary to

ANALYSIS OF THE VOICE (continued), étudier.

study.
Il faut aller à l'église et à l'école. It is necessary to go to church and to

VIII.- CORRECT INFLECTION (continued.
school.
Il faut rester à la maison.
It is necessary to remain at home.

Both inflections, the Rising and the Falling, in connection. Il me faut lire un bon livre.* I must read a good book.

Rule 1.--When negation is opposed to affirmation, the former Il lui faut aller voir sa mère. She must go and see her mother, has the rising, the latter the falling inflection, in whatever order Que nous faut-il faire ? What must ice do ?

they occur, and whether in the same or in different sentences, Que leur faut-il lire ?

What must they read ?
Que leur faut-il ?

What do they want or need ?
Il leur faut de l'argent ou du They need or must have money or

He did not call me, but you.
crédit.
credit,

He was esteemed not for wealth, but for wisdom.

Study not for amusement, but for improvement. • Another construction of these sentences will be fourd in Sect. XXI. 1, 2.

This adverb can never be placed before a substantive.

necessary.

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ence

He called you, not mé.

Rule on the Monotone. He was esteemed for wisdom, not for wéalth.

The tones of grand and sublime description, profound reverStudy for improvement, not for amúsement.

This proposal is not a mere dle cómpliment. It proceeds from the or awe, of amazement and horror, are marked by the sincerest and deepest feelings of our hearts.

monotone, or perfect level of voice. Howard visited all Europe, not to survey the sumptuousness of Note.—A monotone is always on a lower pitch than the prepalaces, or the stateliness of témples ; not to make accurate measure- ceding part of a sentence; and to give the greater effect to its ments of the remains of ancient grandeur; not to form a scale of the deep solemn note-which resembles the tolling of a heavy bell curiosities of modern árt; not to collect medals or collate manuscripts; -it sometimes destroys all comma pauses, and keeps up one but to dive into the depths of dùngeons ; to plunge into the infection continuous stream of overflowing sound, as :of hospitals; to survey the mansions of sorrow and pain; to take the gauge and dimensions of misery, depression, and contempt; to remem.

His form had not yet lost ber the forgotten, to attend to the neglected, to visit the forsaken,

All her original brightness, nor appeared and to compare and collate the distresses of all men in all countries.

Less than archangel ruined, and the excess

Of glory obscured. As when the sûn, nēw-risen, Note.—A similar principle applies to the reading of conces.

Looks through the horizontal misty air, sions and of unequal antitheses or contrasts. In the latter,

Shorn of his béams, or from behind the moon, the less important member has the rising, and the preponderant

In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight shēds one the falling inflection, in whatever part of a sentence they

On half the nătions, and with fear of change occur, and even in separate sentences, as :

Perplexes inonarchs. Science may raise you to éminence. But virtue alone can guide you And I saw a great white thrõne and Him that sät on it, from whose to happiness.

face the hêavens and the earth fled away; and there was found no place I rather choose

for them.
To wrong the dead, to wrong myself and you,

Upon my secûre hour thy uncle stole,
Than I will wrong such hónourable men.

With juice of cürsed hēbenon in a vial,

And in the porches of mine dars did pour Exception. When negation is emphatic or preponderant, it

The lēperous distilment; whose effect takes the falling inflection, as :

Hõlds such an ēnmity with blood of mān, He may yield to persuasion, but he will never submit to fòrce.

That swift as quicksilver it courses thrõugh

The natural gates and alleys of the body, We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed; perplexed, but

And, with a sudden vigour, it doth posset not in despàir; persecuted, but not forsaken; cast dówn, but not

And curd, like eager drõppings into milk, destroyed.

The thin and wholesome blood ; so did it mine; Rule 2.-In question and answer, the falling inflection ends

And a most instant tētter barked about, as far below the average level of the sentence, as the rising ends

Most lāzar-like, with vile and loathsome crūst, above it. In this way, a certain exact correspondence of sound

All my smooth body. to sound, in the inflections, is produced, which gives to the full

Rule on Harmonic" Inflections. downward slide of the answer a decisive and satisfactory intona

“Harmonic" inflections-or those which, in emphatic phrases, tion, as a reply to the rising slide of the question, as :

are intended to prevent the frequent occurrence of emphasis in An they Hébrews -So am 'I. Are they 'Israelites -So am 'I. the same phrase from becoming monotonous to the ear-are What would content you, in a political leader P-Tálent? Nò!- applied in clauses of which every word is emphatic, and are 'Enterprise ? No!-Cóurage? No!-Reputátion? Nò !_*Virtue? marked by a distinct and separate inflection, as :No! -The man whom you would select, should possess not one, but all of these.

He has been guilty of one of the most shameful acts || that ever do. Rule 3. -- When a question consists of two contrasted parts, gràded I the N'ature || or the NA’ME || of w'an. connected in syntax by the conjunction or, used in a disjunctive

Note.--In such cases the inflections usually alternate, in order sense, the former has the rising, and the latter the falling in to give the more vivid and pungent force to vehement emphasis. flection, as :

Rule on Repeated Words, Phrases, and Sentences. Does be mean you, or mè ?

Words, phrases, and sentences which are repeated for effect, Is this book yours, or mine ?

rise higher, or fall lower in inflection, besides increasing in force, Did you see him, or his brother?

at every repetition. Are the people virtuous, or vicious; intélligent, or ignorant; áffluent,

From these walls a spirit shall go forth, that shall survive when this or indigent?"

edifice shall be,“ like an unsubstantial pageant, faded.” It shall go Note.- When or is used conjunctively, the second inflection fórth, exulting in, but not abusing, its strength. It shall go forth, does not fall, but rises higher than the first, as :

remembering, in the days of its prosperity, the pledges it gave in the

time of its depression. IT SHALL GO FO'RTH, uniting a disposition to Would the influence of the Bible-even if it were not the record of correct abuses, to redress grievances. IT SHALL GO FOʻRTH, uniting divine revelation-be to render princes more tyrannical, or subjects the disposition to improve, with the resolution to maintain and defend, more angúvernable; the rich more insolent, or the poor more dis- by that spirit of unbought affection, which is the chief defence of orderly; would it make worse párents or children--húsbands or wives nations. -másters or servants-friends or neighbours? Ort would it not What was it, fellow-citizens, which gave to Lafayette his spotless inake men more virtuous, and consequently more happy, in every fame?-The love of liberty. What has consecrated his memory in the situation?

hearts of good men ?—THE LOVE OF LIBERTY, What nerved his youthRule on the Circumflex, or Wave.

ful arm with strength, and inspired him in the morning of his days

with sagacity and counsel ?-THE LIVING LOVE OF LIBERTY. The circumflex, or wave, applies to all expressions used in a To what did he sacrifice power, and rank, and country, and freedom peculiar sense, or with a double meaning, and to the tones of itself --TO THE LOVE OF LIBERTY PROTECTED BY LAW. mockery, sarcasm, and irony, as :You may avoid a quarrel with an il.

Your if is the only peacemaker: much virtue in an if,

LESSONS IN PENMANSHIP.-XXVI. From the very first night--and to say it I am bold

With this lesson, which is accompanied by copy-slips headed I've been so very hot, that I'm sure I've caught côla ! by the remaining capital letters of the writing alphabet, from Go hang a calfskin on these recreant limbs !

S to Z, we complete our elementary series of Lessons in Pen. What a b&autiful piece of work you have made by your carelessness! manship, having enabled the self-teacher, by an easy and careThe weights had never been accused of light conduct.

fully graduated succession of steps, to advance from the formation

of the first elementary stroke that enters into the composition In successive questions, the rising inflection becomes higher at found capital letters and figurez, as well as small letters. We

of the small letters, to writing sentences in which are to be every stage, unless the last hus, as in the above example, the falling have now don; as much for him as it is possible to do by verbal inflection of consummating emphasis.

1 The last or is used disjunctively, and forms an example to the instruction, and it remains for the learner to acquire an easy, Rule, and not to the Note.

flowing style of writing, and facility and rapidity in the use of

COPY-SLIP NO. 99.-SMEATON BUILT THE EDDYSTONE LIGHTHOUSE.

COPY-SLIP NO. 100.—THE ART OF PRINTING INVENTED BY KOSTER, 1438.

COPY-SLIP NO. 101.-ULM IN GERMANY.

Smeaten built the Eddupitone Lighthouse. Sheart of printingrimentalny Katest 10

rin Germany Underin Rapat, 125 Wellingten, ternsjegdieren . Pers. chief seat of the mim trade in Spain Yarmandlarim. Arjedhofamens faria herninga Zellverain, the German lustema Haren, tek

COPY-SLIP NO. 102.-VICTORIA REGINA, 1837.

COPY-SLIP NO. 103.-WELLINGTON, BORN 1769, DIED 1852.

COPY-SLIP NO. 104.-XERES, CHIEF SEAT OF THE WINE TRADE IN SPAIN.

COPY-SLIP NO. 105.-YARMOUTH, IN NORFOLK, FAMOUS FOR ITS HERRINGS.

COPY-SLIP NO. 106.-ZOLLVEREIN, THE GERMAN CUSTOMS UNION, 1818.

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