Popular Science Monthly, Band 68

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McClure, Phillips and Company, 1906
 

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Seite 418 - By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon, Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honour by the locks...
Seite 302 - For yet seven days, and I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days and forty nights; and every living substance that I have made will I destroy from off the face of the earth.
Seite 373 - Through glowing orchards forth they peep, Each from its nook of leaves ; And fearless there the lowly sleep, As the bird beneath their eaves.
Seite 22 - LET it be granted that a straight line may be drawn from any one point to any other point.
Seite 478 - I mean stock to remain in this country, to the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
Seite 40 - A CLEVER man builds a city, A clever woman lays one low; With all her qualifications, that clever woman Is but an ill-omened bird. A woman with a long tongue Is a flight of Steps leading to calamity; For disorder does not come from heaven, But is brought about by women. * Among those who cannot be trained or taught Are women and eunuchs.
Seite 22 - Magnitudes which coincide with one another, that is, which exactly fill the same space, are equal to one another.
Seite 419 - ... shed tears for. Had these men any quarrel? Busy as the Devil is, not the smallest! They lived far enough apart: were the entirest strangers: nay. in so wide a Universe, there was even, unconsciously, by Commerce, some mutual helpfulness between them. How then? Simpleton! Their governors had fallen out: and instead of shooting one another, had the cunning to make these poor blockheads shoot.
Seite 419 - is given ; and they blow the souls out of one another; and in place of sixty brisk, useful craftsmen, the world has sixty dead carcasses which it must bury and anew shed tears for.
Seite 21 - A circle is a plane figure contained by one line, which is called the circumference, and is such, that all straight lines drawn from a certain point within the figure to the circumference are equal to one another : 16.

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