The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of Mr. Steeven's [!] Last Edition, with a Selection of the Most Important Notes ...

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Seite 78 - I have liv'd long enough : my way of life Is fallen into the sear, the yellow leaf : And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses not loud, but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Seite 18 - ... Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels trumpet-tongued against The deep damnation of his taking-off; And pity, like a naked new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim horsed Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind.
Seite 18 - Was the hope drunk, Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since ? And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely ? from this time Such I account thy love.
Seite 25 - Infirm of purpose! Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead Are but as pictures: 'tis the eye of childhood That fears a painted devil. If he do bleed, I'll gild the faces of the grooms withal, For it must seem their guilt.
Seite 25 - So brainsickly of things. Go get some water, And wash this filthy witness from your hand. Why did you bring these daggers from the place ? They must lie there : go carry them, and smear The sleepy grooms with blood. Macb. I'll go no more: I am afraid to think what I have done ; Look on't again I dare not.
Seite 10 - Implored your highness' pardon and set forth A deep repentance: nothing in his life Became him like the leaving it; he died As one that had been studied in his death, To throw away the dearest thing he owed As 'twere a careless trifle.
Seite 208 - Hath it slept since? And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely? From this time Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard To be the same in thine own act and valour As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, And live a coward in thine own esteem, Letting "I dare not" wait upon "I would," Like the poor cat i
Seite 270 - It has been already mentioned, in the law against witches, that they are supposed to take up dead bodies to use in enchantments, which was confessed by the woman whom king James examined ; and who had of a dead body, that was divided in one of their assemblies, two fingers for her share. It is...
Seite 42 - Come, seeling night, Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day, And with thy bloody and invisible hand, Cancel and tear to pieces that great bond Which keeps me pale.
Seite 25 - What hands are here? ha! they pluck out mine eyes! Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand? No; this my hand will rather The multitudinous seas incarnadine, Making the green one red.

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