The Miscellaneous Prose Works of Sir Walter Scott, Bart, Band 19

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Seite 133 - France came in sight of the English his blood began to boil, and he cried out to his marshals, "Order the Genoese forward, and- begin the battle, in the name of God and St. Denis.
Seite 87 - Thornton. A SPORTING TOUR THROUGH THE NORTHERN PARTS OF ENGLAND AND GREAT PART OF THE HIGHLANDS OF SCOTLAND. By Colonel T. THORNTON, of Thornville Royal, in Yorkshire. With the Original Illustrations by GARRARD, and other Illustrations and Coloured Plates by GE LODGE.
Seite 331 - I leave to my friend, Mr. John Home, of Kilduff, ten dozen of my old claret, at his choice ; and one single bottle of that other liquor called port. I also leave to him six dozen of port, provided that he attests under his hand, signed John Hume, that he has himself alone finished that bottle at two sittings. By this concession, he will at once terminate the only two differences that ever arose between us concerning temporal matters.
Seite 197 - Our friend Gay is used as the friends of Tories are by Whigs — and generally by Tories too. Because he had humour, he was supposed to have dealt with Dr. Swift, in like manner as when any one had learning formerly, he was thought to have dealt with the devil...
Seite 29 - ... moss from the grey stones, renewing with his chisel the half-defaced inscriptions, and repairing the emblems of death with which these simple monuments are usually adorned.
Seite 134 - They hooted a third time, advancing with their cross-bows presented, and began to shoot. The English archers then advanced one step forward, and shot their arrows with such force and quickness, that it seemed as if it snowed. When the Genoese felt these arrows, which pierced their arms, heads, and through their...
Seite 332 - D—n my commission,' said the warlike chaplain, throwing it towards his colonel. It may easily be supposed that the matter was only remembered as a good jest; but the future historian of Rome shared the honours and dangers of that dreadful day, where, according to the account of the French themselves, ' the Highland furies rushed in upon them with more violence than ever did a sea driven by a tempest.
Seite 134 - ... some of them cut the strings of their crossbows, others flung them on the ground, and all turned about, and retreated, quite discomfited. The French had a large body of men-at-arms on horseback, richly dressed, to support the Genoese. *' The King of France, seeing them thus fell back, cried out, * Kill me those scoundrels; for they stop up our road, without any reason.
Seite 132 - There were of the Genoese crossbows about a fifteen thousand, but they were so weary of going afoot that day a six leagues armed with their crossbows, that they said to their constables, 'We be not well ordered to fight this day, for we be not in the case to do any great deed of arms; we have more need of rest.
Seite 301 - In short," as our friend expressed himself, " the dragoons and Highlanders divided the honours of the day, and on that occasion, at least, the race was to the swift, and the battle to the strong.

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