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“No, I'd much rather not," I don't want to correct I said firmly. “And I greatly you, Tom. I like you as you prefer sober language when the are, really very much indeed.” subject is serious."

“But you don't want too “I'm afraid that shows you much of me," he said with a don't care very much. But I hurt laugh, and a blush like a do, you see."

boy's rose up to his forehead. What it shows is-since I “I have never had too much mean to be as fair and candid of you yet," I answered, as to you as you have been to gently as I could. “I thought me—that once I cared so much we two were the best of pals, that no language would have and I should simply hate to seemed flowery and exaggerated lose you. That is the simple to me.

But the man I cared truth." for like that is dead. I was "Thank you, Joey. I won't only eighteen at the time. And bother you any more at present. two years ago I was engaged And if that is understood, you to some one else, but I broke need not relegate me to an it off; it doesn't matter why. awful distance, need you ! So you see I am not the girlish Can't we go on as we are ?" innocent thing you have pro “Of course. Why on earth bably imagined me."

should you recede into the “I didn't imagine you any- distance ? It's I who have to thing of the sort, but-" do that, worse luck! Oh, look

“And I am not a bit like at Connie, with those immense Connie, gracious and kind and long shears. What on earth is trustful."

she up to ?Well, what are you, Joey?" Pruning the gooseberry

“Oh, I can't very easily tell bushes, I should think. Quite you that.

It's easy to say the wrong time, most likely. what I'm not; but how can Here, Connie, wait for us." a person wrap themselves up She stood still, and looked at in a definition and present it us with her placid smile. But neatly! Besides, you wouldn't there was inquiry in her eyes. believe it."

“No, she won't, Connie. Not “To me you seem like a girl this time, anyway," Tom said, with sense and pluck, and a with perfect simplicity. kind heart."

She only gave a quick little No, not very kind. I admit sigh, and at once took my the sense.'

hand. “Well, sense is a very big It occurred to me, and not thing when it comes to living till that moment, how very with a person. You don't mind much I should like to have my saying that, do you i though Connie for a sister. It actually I don't suppose I should admire made her brother more desirit in a girl with little sharp able in my eyes. But I can't eyes and a correcting voice. I explain this exactly. I only couldn't stand being corrected." felt that they were very nice

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people; there wasn't a single “necessaries.” My own occustreak of commonness in either pied me for about one hour. of them, and I was sorry to What a nuisance it would be going away.

be to have a load of possessions, Winderleigh was the kind of and be obliged to take care of house that gave you a touch them! A house would be even of home-sickness at leaving worse, never without some It was gunny and spacious, with worry to keep you indoors such a lovely outlook on the when you wanted to go out. park, and such a cheerful noise The very idea of that “rather of the boys' feet, running races pretty place” turned me cold. down the long corridors. They Now, Hilda would revel in it. were told not to do it at least On our last morning at home, twice a day.

while we were searching the But I had to get home, and borders for some early daffodils, in time, too, to meet Hilda at we heard the well-known hoot the station. I was afraid she of Connie's little car, and found would feel this first coming her at the hall-door with her home to the lonely house rather brother, come to say good-bye hard; but, in truth, she was to us. Off went the two gartoo much excited to think about deners to the spring border, that.

discussing bulbs and compar“Now, what do you think I ing notes. What a bore it have done, Joey?” was her would be to have to do that ! first remark. “I have taken All married people seem to our tickets in the Celtic, and decline into gardeners by some she will sail from Liverpool in natural law. three days. Oh, indeed, it was Tom and I remained on the much the best thing to do! high terrace-walk with the yewWhat is there to wait for now hedge, where the sun always You couldn't expect me to wait shines in the morning. It retill the end of the hunting minds me of Bill Gresham when season. Of course not. And, I walk there, and of the day you see, March will be over just when I surprised him so much. before we land ; 80 it will be That was rather too bad of all right."

me, of course, but it was such She still retained that terror fun. One wouldn't have done of the month of March in it to quite an ordinary man. Canada which Nurse Evans I began to compare Bill Greshad carefully implanted in her ham, tall and strong, and mind. I swiftly realised that bronzed in the face by African the tickets were taken, and suns, with Tom Milbanke walkdelay impossible. So I made ing beside me. no useless protests. I suppose, He had a light step and a as Tom says, I have sense. I good figure; he wasn't handhelped Hilda to give some last some, or even good-looking, but directions round the place, and thoroughly well-bred. I liked to collect her multitudinous his eyes and the way his hair

good

grew; as to his voice, I think my telling him to sell them for I have said quite enough about whatever they would bring. his voice. Bill Gresham's voice He was quite business-like borders on a growl.

and cheerful this morning, with“Would you like these vio- out the least touch of the dislets 9" Tom inquired. “If you appointed admirer about him. don't want them, I'll give them He tried to hurry Connie away to Mrs Trent."

before she was ready, and “How impartially kind you laughed when he said “ are! But I want them for bye." myself. Parma violets are im I ought to have been pleased portant to my happiness. I at this, but I wasn't. I had used to buy them in winter, at been thinking rather remorsea time when I hadn't enough fully of him since the day I for my gloves."

left Winderleigh. If he had “Now, as a woman of for- spoken differently that last tune, and frightfully indepen- time on the terrace, or rather, dent, could you bring your if he had looked differently, I mind down to these two horses might have said what was in of yours, and what I am to my mind. But you can't do do about selling them Of that very well in the middle of course you've told Dick Hall calculating prices. what you wish.”

Was he perhaps sorry that We plunged into the subject he had spoken so plainly to of the horses, and the price me once, only to get a refusal, they would fetch. I thought and wanted me to see that it they were now worth more didn't matter so enormously than I had paid for them, con- to him after all ? Quite possidering how they had im- sible. But it was not the right proved. But Tom thought not, way of working on my feelings, for the season was not far from if successful. an end, and Redwing was a For the truth is, on that last whistler. I was bound to lose morning I had felt in what money over her, and the grey Rosalind called “a more comwas not up to much weight, ing-on disposition,” if only Tom though sound, and a clever had been clever enough to see fencer. Of course, it ended in it. But he wasn't.

(To be concluded.)

A DUFFER'S LUCK WITH SPINNING TACKLE.

BY STEPHEN GWYNN.

Many people think they can back from the Cork Blackfish because they have learnt water, where some ill-judging to use a wet fly on small rivers person had let him and his and mountainy lakes in Ireland employer loose in July on or Scotland. That was my case Carysville, after the river had till—well, the age does not been only fly-fished all summer. matter, but more than old They got close on ninety in a enough to know a vast deal fortnight, "routing them out better. Put it that I had been of old holes," said Michael. fishing for more than thirty But neither the Lydons nor years off and on in Donegal anybody else could make me and similar places before I enjoy prawn-fishing on condescended to try spinning. high walk at Galway, where Worms for muddy water I you get a crick in your back knew and disliked; once when stooping out over the swift I did slay a splendid great water far away below you, white trout this way I felt a and where there are so many criminal. It was not a much salmon that it is an insult if happier moment when I first you are not getting one every got a salmon with a prawn at half-hour. My conversion to Galway. But, to begin with, bait-fishing dates from a weekit is no credit to anybody to end on the Test just above catch a salmon in Galway : Romsey. My host, so accomnothing under four or five plished with the dry-fly that there is worth mentioning : to he scarcely troubled to pracgo on with, fishing the prawn tise his art, went off with his as they do it there is not other guest after trout, and spinning; it is a branch of confided me to his old keeper, the art by itself and, as the no fly - fisher, but a great Lydon family practise it, pro- performer with the minnow. bably the deadliest of all. I What he put up was a huge would not trust the most ex- prawn rigged as a spinner ; perienced salmon with Michael and with a stout cast and lavish Lydon and a Galway“ shrimp.” provision of lead, I splashed “If there is any little run of my way down half a mile of water at all, they musht take that lovely river. The sky was it,” he said to me once, and blue, the sun shining bright, he evidently believed it. Faith- the water like crystal, and catching is a surer thing than heaven was witness how clumfaith-healing. I think that was sily I got the thing out, when the day when I met Michael it did get out: for we fished

are !

grew; as to his voice, I think my telling him to sell them for I have said quite enough about whatever they would bring. his voice. Bill Gresham's voice He was quite business-like borders on a growl.

and cheerful this morning, with“Would you like these vio- out the least touch of the dislets ? " Tom inquired. “If you appointed admirer about him. don't want them, I'll give them He tried to hurry Connie away to Mrs Trent.”

before she was ready, and “How impartially kind you laughed when he said "good

But I want them for bye.” myself. Parma violets are im I ought to have been pleased portant to my happiness. I at this, but I wasn't. I had used to buy them in winter, at been thinking rather remorsea time when I hadn't enough fully of him since the day I for my gloves."

left Winderleigh. If he had "Now, as a woman of for- spoken differently that last tune, and frightfully indepen- time on the terrace, or rather, dent, could you bring your if he had looked differently, I mind down to these two horses might have said what was in of yours, and what I am to my mind. But you can't do do about selling them Of that very well in the middle of course you've told Dick Hall calculating prices. what you wish."

Was he perhaps sorry that We plunged into the subject he had spoken so plainly to of the horses, and the price me once, only to get a refusal, they would fetch. I thought and wanted me to see that it they were now worth more didn't matter so enormously than I had paid for them, con- to him after all Quite possidering how they had im- sible. But it was not the right proved. But Tom thought not, way of working on my feelings, for the season was not far from if successful. an end, and Redwing was a For the truth is, on that last whistler. I was bound to lose morning I had felt in what money over her, and the grey Rosalind called “a more comwas not up to much weight, ing-on disposition," if only Tom though sound, and a clever had been clever enough to see fencer. Of course, it ended in it. But he wasn't.

(To be concluded.)

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