Victorian Prose: An Anthology

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Rosemary J. Mundhenk, LuAnn McCracken Fletcher
Columbia University Press, 27.08.1999 - 504 Seiten

This engaging, informative collection of Victorian nonfiction prose juxtaposes classic texts and canonical writers with more obscure writings and authors in order to illuminate important debates in nineteenth-century Britain—inviting modern readers to see the age anew. The collection represents the voices of a broad scope of women and men on a range of nineteenth-century cultural issues and in various forms—from periodical essays to travel accounts, letters to lectures, and autobiographies to social surveys.

With its fifty-six substantial selections, Victorian Prose reaches beyond the work of Carlyle, Newman, Mill, Arnold, and Ruskin to uncover an array of lesser-known voices of the era. Women writers are given full attention—writings by Mary Prince, Dinah M. Craik, Florence Nightingale, Frances P. Cobbe, and Lucie Duff Gordon are among the entries.

Excerpts cover such topics of the age as British imperialism, the crisis of religious faith, and debates about gender. On the issue of colonial expansion, opinions range from Benjamin Disraeli's celebration of empire-building as evidence of Britain's glory to David Livingstone's promotion of commerce with Africa as a way to retard the slave trade and make it unprofitable. Views on "the woman question" extend from John Stuart Mill's defense of women's rights to Mrs. Humphry Ward's opposition to women's franchise and Sarah Ellis's support for the domestic ideal.

This invaluable resource features:

attention to important noncanonical writers—including a generous selection of women writers;

a wide range of written forms, including periodical essays, travel accounts, letters, lectures, autobiographies, and social surveys;

both chronological and thematic tables of contents—the latter encompassing subject areas such as England at home and abroad, the new sciences, religion, and the status of women;

selections drawn from the original nineteenth-century editions; and

annotations to each text that aid nonspecialists in understanding unfamiliar names, terms, and cultural debates.

 

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Inhalt

IV
xxvii
V
7
VI
11
VII
19
VIII
26
IX
51
XI
57
XII
69
XXXVII
257
XXXVIII
265
XXXIX
268
XL
271
XLII
277
XLIII
281
XLIV
285
XLV
293

XIII
85
XIV
91
XVI
99
XVII
105
XVIII
113
XIX
119
XX
129
XXI
141
XXII
155
XXIV
163
XXV
173
XXVI
181
XXVII
187
XXVIII
197
XXIX
205
XXX
213
XXXI
219
XXXIII
227
XXXIV
233
XXXV
239
XXXVI
245
XLVI
303
XLVII
311
XLVIII
317
XLIX
323
L
327
LI
335
LII
347
LIII
357
LIV
362
LV
369
LVI
375
LVII
383
LVIII
391
LIX
399
LX
407
LXI
415
LXII
421
LXIII
425
LXIV
447
LXVI
453
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Über den Autor (1999)

Rosemary J. Mundhenk is professor of English at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

LuAnn McCracken Fletcher is assistant professor of English at Cedar Crest College in Allentown, Pennsylvania.

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