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MONTHLY
MIRROR:

REFLECTING

MEN AND MANNERS.

WITH

STRICTURES ON THEIR EPITOME,

The Stage.

To hold as 'twere the MIRROR up to Nature.

-

VOL. XVII.

Embellished with superb Engravings.

London:
PRINTED FOR THE PROPRIETORS,
By J. Wright, No. 38, St. John's Square, Clerkenwell.
And published by Vernor and Hood in the Poultry;
sold, also, by all the Booksellers in

the United Kingdoma.

MONTHLY MIRROR,

FON
JANUARI, 1804:

Embellished with
A PORTRAIT OF SIR JAMES MACKINTOSH, ENGRAVED BY RIDLEY, FROM

AN ORIGINAL PAINTING BY OPIE.

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CONTENTS.
: MISCELLANEOUS. | Poesie Liriche di Leucippo Egineo

P. A. ................... .

Extraordinary Dreams .............. 5

5 || White's Sermon, preached on the i

Vanity ...........

Fast Day .........................

DRAMATIC.

Remarks on the Garden Spider, by

Thirlwall's Royalty Theatre ........ ib.

Robert Bloomfield
Christinas .......... ..

Green's Observations on the Drama ib.

Roman Letters. Letter III. ...... 17

Sir Henry Lee and his Dog .........

BRITISH STAGE.

An Account of the King's College

Chapel, Cambridge, and of the

Remarks on the Scenery introduced

at Drury-Lane theatre, in the

Origin of Free Masonry ........ 20

Select Šentences ........

Comedy of “ A bold Stroke

Popularity ..................

23

for a Wife" :......................... 42

Occasional Prologue, performed at

the Opening of the Theatre

REVIEW OF LITERATURE..

Roval in the Haymarket ..... 44

MISCELLANEOUS.

| Seymour's Notes upon Snakspere 51

Adolphus's History of France, from

i

n

the Year 1790 to the Peace cf. ' ORXGINAL POETRY,

* Amiens in 1802 ..................25 11 Di Petrarca, Sorretto ..............

St. Clair, or the Heiress of Des-

Prandation...................

Inond .......................

Byerly's' Catastrophe, a fale,

Apostrophe to England ...

founded on Facts ...................

Swiftiana ...

in: Sonnet ................................., 55

The Poetical Magazine ................ MEMORANDA DRAMATICA, &c.

Amphlett's Invasion, a descriptive

and satirical Poem .............. ib.

Drury-Lane ............................ 55

Best's Royal Soldier, a Serinon... ib.

Covent-Garden ............
Barns's two Sermons, preached at

the Church of Renfrew ......... ib. PROVINCIAL DRAMA, &c.

Preston's Translation of the Argo-

Wolverhampton .........................

nautics of Apollonius Rhodius ib.

Boston (America) .....................

Scolfield's Bible Stories .............. 35

Lewes .......................

Buonaparte in the West Indies .... ib.

Norwich ...........

Mrs. G. Sewell's Poems .......... ib.

Westminster Play

Clapham's Sermotrs .................. th.

The Temple of the Fairies, No. I. 36

Tugd's Sermon, .......

37 " News, &c. ................

Sold, also, by all the Booksellers in

the United Kingdom.

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OUR Volumes have been so many, and the public encouragement they have received has been so uniforme by flattering, that what we have latterly offered to our Readers, in the way of PREFACE, has seldom amounted to more than a tender of our grateful acknowledgments for the favours they have shewn us. Upon a review of the past Volume, we are not conscious of having for. feited our claim to the public patronage ; and we trust that the piesent will.net :meanifest any departure from the principle and spirit. ufici first recommended the work to notice, and from that splendour of embellish: ment, and superior ileg önce of typographical execution, which distinguish it from every periodical work of a similar description.

The memoir of Sir James Mackintosh will appear in the ensuing number.'

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EXTRAORDINARY DREAMS. Though it be true, that, in the multitude, or major part, of dreams, there are diverse vanities, Eccles. v. 7; though it be likewise acknowledged, that whoso regardeth (Ó ETEXwv, he that leaneth, or layeth great stress, upon) dreams in general, is like him that catchetla at a shadow, and followeth after the wind, Eccles. xxxiv. 2; forasmuch as dreams have deceived many, and they have failed that put their trust in them; yet the same wise writer, from whom the two last passages are quoted, guards his remarks by the following caveat (v. 9.) Set not thy heart upon them (i. e. upon dreams), if they be not sent from the Most High in thy visitation. And we have it from an incomparably superior authority, that, in a dream, in a vision, when deep sleep falleth upon man, in slumberings upon the bed; then God openeth the ears of men, and sealeth their instructions: Job xxxiii. 15, 16.

Examples of supernatural dreams occur so frequently in the sam cred volume, that no man can explode all dreams as vain, without exploding the Bible at the same time. God came to Abimelech, in a dream; Genesis xx. 3.-The angel of God spake to Jacob in a dream: Genesis xxxi. 11. -Very remarkable was Jacob's dream at Bethel: Gen. xxviii.- Joseph's two dreams were evidently pro phetic: Gen, xxxvii.-So were those of king Pharaoh : Gen. xli. And of the Jewish soldier: Josh. vii. 13.- When God took away the spirit of prophecy from Saul, it is said that the Lord answered him not by dreams: 1 Sam. xxxviii. 6.-At Gibeon, the Lord aypeared to Solomon, in a dream, by night: 1 Kings iii. 5.-Nebuchadnezzar's predictive dreams were, undeniably, from God: Dante ü. and iv.-As was Daniel's, concerning the four universal monarchies : Dan. vii.

Your old men shall dream dreams, is a promise made to Joel; and it began to have its accomplishment in Joseph, the espoused and nominal husband of the Virgin Mary. It was in a dream that the angel of the Lord appeared to this holy man, and forbade him to suspect the purity of his unsullied bride. In the same dream it was revealed to Joseph, that he should give to the Messiah the name of Jesus, because that blessed person was to save his people from

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