Preliminary Report on the Coalinga Oil District, Fresno and Kings Counties, California

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1908 - Petroleum - 142 pages
 

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Page 61 - Tulare formation does not come into contact with the oil-bearing formations and contains no traces of oil. Over most of the area in which it occurs it is separated by so great a thickness of deposits from the productive zones that its mere presence is usually sufficient to indicate the inaccessibility of the oil.
Page 55 - The Etchegoin formation is nowhere within the Coalinga district known to contain any petroleum, but like the Jacalitos it has an important relation to the question of accessibility of the oil. Some wells in the Coalinga field pass through a considerable portion or the whole of this formation before reaching the Jacalitos or lower formations. All wells drilled around the edge of Pleasant Valley, or on Anticline Ridge, or in the Kettleman Hills will have to pass through this formation, and its thickness...
Page 73 - The shales are composed in large part of the tests of foraminifera and diatoms, and a smaller number of other organisms, in such abundance as fully to warrant the assumption that the animal and vegetable material that must have been contained in them when deposited was adequate for furnishing a quantity of hydrocarbons and other compounds more than equivalent to the quantity of petroleum found in this field...
Page 37 - The Big Blue is overlain by the Tamiosoma zone, which comprises a thickness of about 175 feet of fossiliferous, fine, medium-grained, and coarse, usually gray sand and minor amounts of conglomerate. This in turn is overlain by 400 to 500 feet of alternating beds of fine sand, sandy clay, coarser sand, and gravel up to the base of the prominent and thick gravel zone considered as marking the base of the Jacalitos.
Page 70 - The anticlinal theory of oil accumulation assumes that the oil, being of less specific gravity, rises above the water present in porous rocks and collects at the highest possible points in upward folds, being there confined by impervious strata arching over the folds. The presence of water, according to this theory, is considered as fundamentally necessary for the carrying out of the process of accumulation in anticlines.
Page 12 - Coalinga with the main lines of the Southern Pacific and the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe railroads in the San Joaquin Valley, and wagon roads enter the district at several points from the valley on the east. Roads cross the Diablo Range from the west...
Page 19 - ... as the edge of the valley is approached. The different formations that may be recognized as units in this series, with the time divisions to which they correspond, are as follows, from the oldest to the youngest: Franciscan (Jurassic?), Knoxville (Lower Cretaceous), Chico (Upper Cretaceous), Tejon (Eocene), Vaqueros (lower Miocene), Santa Margarita (?) (upper middle Miocene), Jacalitos (early upper Miocene), Etchegoin (uppermost Miocene), Tulare (Pliocene and early Pleistocene), and Quaternary...
Page 21 - These rocks are of Cretaceous age and comprise part or all of the two formations well known elsewhere on the west coast as Knoxville (lower Cretaceous) and Chico (upper Cretaceous). Owing to the lack of fossil or stratigraphic evidence in the Coalinga district sufficient to form the basis for a separation between these two formations, they are mapped and described together for the present. The rocks, however, may be separated lithologically into three divisions. A marked distinction between the lower...
Page 74 - ... and certain details of culture, such as towns, section lines, property lines, a few roads, and oil wells. The structure in the productive territory is indicated by contours showing the distance above (marked + ) or below (marked — ) sea level of the base of the Big Blue or top of zone B in the Eastside field, and of the top of zone B in the Westside field. The contour interval is 100 feet. By means of this map the direction and amount of dip of the strata in the oil-bearing formation may be...
Page 24 - Tejon formation is thick, the shale portion forms a greater proportion of the whole than does the sandstone, the middle beds being chiefly of fine grain. The middle beds differ from those at the top in being more argillaceous, of a darker color, less prominent, and more frequently interbedded with sandy beds. There are three separate areas in which the Tejon is exposed, one in the oil field north of Pleasant Valley, another on the eastern border of the Alcalde Hills just west of Coalinga, and the...

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