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planted upon spots where, ere then, the prince of darkness had sat enthroned.

It was dedicated to S. Peter and S. Paul, and within its precincts, in after years, were many kings, archbishops, princes, bishops, and nobles interred. Favoured by the protection of popes and princes; having episcopal jurisdiction within itself; loaded with favours and immunities, and possessing immense wealth, the abbey continued to flourish from year to year, so that in the fourteenth century its influence and power were unusually great.

At the period of its suppression, in the reign of that ruthless destroyer of beauty and antiquity, King Henry VIII., it was recorded in the exchequer of the kingdom as of the value of £1,412. 45. 7d. Alas! for those days of presumptuous sacrilege, it shared the fate of too many religious houses like itself, being seized for the use of the crown, while its precincts and splendid domains were converted to the most ignoble purposes.

Thank God, the time has at length arrived when holy places, as well as holy persons, are beginning to be honourably and duly appreciated. The ruins of the abbey, after many years of desecration, were at length rescued from further indignity by the purchase of them, together with the surrounding premises, by A. J. B. Hope, Esq., M.P.; he having conceived the noble design of presenting them as a holy offering to our Church, that from that once hallowed spot might go forth a band of faithful ambassadors, to carry the glad tidirigs of salvation to the far off lands of heathenism.

The approbation of the present, as well as the late Lord Primate, having been obtained, the building quickly progressed, and in due time was completed; the 29th day of June being fixed for its solemn consecration. It was a never to be forgotten day! There, upon his exquisitely beautiful, yet unpretending, throne in the Cathedral, sat our Venerable Primate, His Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury; and there by his side, in their robes of beauty and purity, were six of his noble colleagues in office, all evidently joining, with holy devotion, in the solemn services of the day, or enjoying the peal of the solemn anthem, as it rose, reverberated, and died away among the massive pillars and richly sculptured roof of that noble pile. There, also, were hundreds of their brethren, the Clergy, who catching, as it were, from them a glow of holy joy, helped to swell the chorus of the Hallelujah-Chant.

But we must not thus anticipate. At nine o'clock in the morning, the solemn services of the day commenced, by reading of the Consecration Service in the chapel of the college; after which was the celebration of the Holy Communion, administered by the Archbishop, the Bishops of London, Lichfield, and Bishop Coleridge, assisting. The morning service at the Cathedral commenced at twelve o'clock, long before which time the choir, and passages

leading to the Cathedral, had been crowded with eager applicants for admission. The Archbishop, and the Bishops of London, Lichfield, Oxford, Coleridge, Brechin, and Fredericton, having been joined, at the entrance to the Cathedral, by the Archdeacons, Prebends, and Canons of the Cathedral, amounting to a very large number, habited in their robes, the procession moved on; and, as they entered beneath the noble screen, the effect was truly imposing. The vast, yet apparently devout, concourse of persons having been accommodated as well as possible, the Clergy in their academical dress being ranged in the stalls, the service commenced.

Never did we join in the prayers of our beloved Church with a deeper sense of their solemnity and fulness. The service, chanted by the Rev. W. S. H. Barham, was beautiful in the extreme, and carried the imagination back to the days of old, when, doubtless, sounds equally solemn and melodious, had rung through those vaulted aisles. The anthem and solo, both peculiarly suited to the occasion, were “ The LORD gave the Word, &c.," and “How beautiful are the feet, &c.," both of which were most admirably performed.

The lessons for the day were read by Dr. Russell, one of the Canons,—read as we could wish all lessons in our churches were ever read; so clearly, so forcibly, and so expressively, that no word could be lost. The Communion Service was taken by the Dean of Canterbury and Dr. Spry, alternately.

The text chosen by our Venerable Archbishop was from the Epistle to the Ephesians, iii. 10. “To the intent that now to the principalities and powers in heavenly places might be known by the Church, the manifold wisdom of God." His Grace, in plain but impressive language, dwelt first upon the manifold wisdom of our God; secondly, upon the principalities and powers to whom that wisdom was manifested ; and thirdly, upon the duties and privileges of that Church by and through whom that wisdom is manifested; concluding with a forcible appeal to the Christian sympathies and charity of the congregation, in behalf of the newly founded institution. The whole was listened to with devout and apparently gratified attention. Upwards of £900 were collected, to which we understand were added various donations during the day.

Immediately after the service, the Clergy, and those of the rest of the company who had been presented with tickets, repaires again to the college, where a most elegant and sumptuous luncheon had been prepared by the kindness and liberality of Mr. Hope. Universal cheerfulness and happiness appeared to reign. Here might be seen the Venerable Primate and Bishops in close and friendly intercourse with each other, or their brethren the Clergy. Here, again, numbers of friends,-many met once more after long separation,—acknowledging and greeting each other; and there, numbers of our nobility and gentry, rejoicing in the prospect thus opened, of increased strength and future good likely to accrue to our Church from the institution thus begun.

There was now full leisure to survey the beauty and durability of the buildings, which are in the “ Decorated ”style peculiar to the fourteenth century. The walls are chiefly composed of flint, with ornaments of rag-stone, and have an imposing, pleasing, and somewhat ancient appearance. The northern side of the building comprises the cloisters beneath (in which the luncheon was spread, and the dwelling rooms above, capable of containing forty-eight students. The eastern side contains the library, which has already been stocked with many valuable and standard works of divinity and science, through the kindness of different benefactors to the institution. The western side of the quadrangle is formed by the chapel, and the houses of the warden and fellows. The chapel is extremely chaste and beautiful, the floor having a tesselated pavement, bearing different inscriptions. The altar and litany table are truly ecclesiastical though plain; the former is approached by three broad steps of marble, and we observed, as somewhat remarkable, the absence of any symbolical sign whatever. The windows, particularly the eastern, are very fine. The Baptism of our Lord, the Epiphany, and Marriage in Cana of Galilee, form the principal subjects of the designs, together with the Annunciation of the Virgin, and the effigies of S. Augustine and S. Gregory.

Less conspicuous are the figures of the four evangelists, and the four greater prophets. Over the whole is cast a somewhat solemn and sombre light, the effect being rather to awaken awe and reverence, than rapturous excitement.

On the southern side of the quadrangle, runs a part of the ancient abbey wall, together with a fine old gateway, which in no degree deteriorates from the correct keeping and ecclesiastical character of the place.

A raised terrace in front of the buildings, together with the conduit in the centre,—which is an octagonal stone, surmounted by a cross,-some fine ancient trees, and newly laid out plots of flowers and grass, form altogether an agreeable contrast, and relieve the eye.

The evening service at five o'clock was, like the morning, well attended; and many visitors might be seen at its close lingering in every nook and cloister of the venerable cathedral, and feasting their minds with the memories of things and persons long past away.

Superfluous and impertinent would it here appear, to tell of the delight which we experienced in our visit to spots hallowed by every sacred and mournful association; how at the shrine of s. Thomas of Canterbury we wept over the days long gone by;

how in the dark and now deserted chapel of S. Anselm, (where we were favoured to meet a company, like ourselves, engaged in contemplating the days of old,-a company consisting of some of the brightest jewels of our Church); how, I say, we there remembered and reverenced departed worth; how, at the tomb of the Black Prince, we recalled the victories of Cressy and Poictiers, and the early prowess of our country. To tell of these recollections of the 29th of June, would be to tell the history of many a venerable prelate and princely warrior.

But it must not be : enough, and too much, perchance, we have already said ; and now we only would add, may it please the God of love and mercy, the great Head of the Church, and supreme Ruler of nations, to grant unto that beloved Church, and our alas ! somewhat infatuated country, in succeeding ages, princes, prelates, and governors of equal virtue, wisdom, and valour! Then shall England, and England's Church, become, as they ought to become,

a praise in all the earth !" Farewell, S. Augustine's! and farewell, noble hearts that planned it. May the one rise and extend her branches far and wide, so that the birds of the air may shelter therein, and may the other receive “ one hundred fold here in this present life, and in the world to come, life everlasting !"

B.

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ON THE DEATH OF MY ONLY SON.

My only boy! my bonnie boy! I seat me by thy side,
And gaze upon those closed eyes, whose fount of light is dried
I fondly gaze upon thy face, but seek in vain that smile,
Which ever could my burthened heart in hours of toil beguile.

No care hath marked thy infant brow, no grief thy heart did fret
For at the very dawn of morn thy sun of life hath set ;
And thou hast sought thy native home—those realms of deathless light-
Ere sin had stained baptismal robes all glistening pure and white.

And now methinks a heavenly light is glowing on thy brow;
A cherub's smile plays on thy face-so beautiful art thou :
Methinks, there watches o'er thy corpse that bright angelic band,
Which bore thy early earth-freed soul unto the Spirit-land.

Then I will check the gushing tear, nor longer dare repine,
For day by day my spirit will communion hold with thine:
Since undivided is the Church-unseen thou still art near,
Hovering around those sorrowing hearts, to which thou wast so dear.

Upon thy grave a cross I'll place,-that blest and hallowed sign,
Which floods the gloomy vale of death with rays of light divine-
On it I'll scatter choicest flowers,-emblems of hope and love,
That tell of resurrection joys in fairer worlds above!

ED.

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separation, acknowledging and greeting each other; ? numbers of our nobility and gentry, rejoicing in the pro opened, of increased strength and future good likely to our Church from the institution thus begun.

There was now full leisure to survey the beauty and of the buildings, which are in the “ Decorated” style the fourteenth century. The walls are chiefly compo with ornaments of rag-stone, and have an imposing, somewhat ancient appearance. The northern side of comprises the cloisters beneath (in which the luncheon and the dwelling rooms above, capable of containin students. The eastern side contains the library, whic been stocked with many valuable and standard wo and science, through the kindness of different bene institution. The western side of the quadrangle is chapel, and the houses of the warden and fellows. extremely chaste and beautiful, the floor havin pavement, bearing different inscriptions.

The a table are truly ecclesiastical though plain; the proached by three broad steps of marble, and we obs what remarkable, the absence of any symbolical The windows, particularly the eastern, are very fine of our Lord, the Epiphany, and Marriage in Ca form the principal subjects of the designs, together w ciation of the Virgin, and the effigies of S. Augusti gory

Less conspicuous are the figures of the four evan four greater prophets. Over the whole is cast a so and sombre light, the effect being rather to awaken ence, than rapturous excitement.

On the southern side of the quadrangle, runs a cient abbey wall, together with a fine old gateway degree deteriorates from the correct keeping and ec racter of the place.

A raised terrace in front of the buildings, togethe duit in the centre,—which is an octagonal stone, su cross,--some fine ancient trees, and newly laid out and grass, form altogether an agreeable eye.

The evening service at Velo attended; and many vine every nook and cloister minds with the mem Superfluous and

SPE the delight which by every

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