Commentaries on the Historical Plays of Shakspeare, Band 1

Cover
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 192 - This day is call'd the feast of Caspian : He that outlives this day and comes safe home Will stand a tip-toe when this day is named, And rouse him at the name of Crispían. He that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his friends. And say—to-morrow is
Seite 17 - King John. It is the curse of kings to be attended By slaves that take their humours for a warrant To break within the bloody house of life ; And, on the winking of authority, To understand a law ; to know the meaning Of dangerous majesty, when perchance it frowns More upon humour than advised respect.
Seite 111 - Oh, gentlemen, the time of life is short ; To spend that shortness basely were too long, If life did ride upon a dial's point. Still ending at the arrival of an hour. And if we live, we live to tread on kings ; If die, brave death, when princes die with us
Seite 106 - from the ground like feather'd Mercury, And vaulted with such ease into his seat, As if an angel dropp'd down from the clouds, To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus, And witch the world with noble horsemanship." We are now brought to the " rebel camp near Shrewsbury,
Seite 55 - gave himself up for lost ; and Shakspeare is, therefore, justified in putting into his mouth the language of despair :— must he lose The name of king ? o" God's name let it go ! I'll give my jewels for a set of beads, My gorgeous palace for an hermitage, My gay apparel for an alms-man's gown.
Seite 179 - And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear That you are worth your breeding ; which I doubt not ; For there is none of you so mean and base That hath not noble lustre in his eyes.
Seite 192 - Then will he strip his sleeve, and show his scars, And say, these wounds I had on Crispin's day. Old men forget, yet shall not all forget, But they'll remember such advantages, What feats they did that day. Then shall our names, Familiar in their mouth as household words— Warwick* and
Seite 187 - and glory on his head ! For forth he goes, and visits all his host ; Bids them good morrow, with a modest smile ; And calls them brothers, friends, and countrymen. Upon his royal face there is no note, How dread an army has enrounded him ; Nor doth he dedicate one jot of colour
Seite 158 - Cant. Hear him but reason in divinity, And, all-admiring, with an inward wish You would desire, the king were made a prelate ; Hear him debate of commonwealth affairs, You'd say,—it hath been all-in-all his study : List his discourse of war, and you shall hear A fearful battle
Seite 192 - He that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his friends. And say—to-morrow is St. Crispían : Then will he strip his sleeve, and show his scars, And say, these wounds I had on Crispin's day. Old men forget, yet shall not all forget, But

Bibliografische Informationen