An Address, Delivered at Lexington, on the 19th (20th) April, 1835

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W.W. Wheildon, 1835 - 66 Seiten
 

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Seite 17 - ... scattered elements of the public wealth ; feuds are reconciled ; differences compromised ; the creditor spares his debtor ; the debtor voluntarily acquits his obligations ; an unseen spirit of order, resource, and power walks, like an invisible angel, through the land; and the people, thoughtful, calm, and collected, await the coming storm. The minds of the people throughout the country had become thoroughly imbued with the great principles of the contest. These principles had for years been...
Seite 40 - Wherever, on the earth's surface, the eye of the 'American shall behold it, may he have reason to bless it! On whatsoever spot it is planted, there may freedom have a foothold, humanity a brave champion, and religion an altar ! Though stained with blood in a righteous cause, may it never in any cause be stained with shame ! Alike, when its gorgeous folds shall wanton in lazy holiday triumphs on the summer breeze, and its tattered fragments be dimly seen through the clouds of war, may it be the joy...
Seite 31 - To them his heart, his love, his griefs were given, But all his serious thoughts had rest in Heaven. As some tall cliff, that lifts its awful form, Swells from the vale and midway leaves the storm, Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread, Eternal sunshine settles on its head.
Seite 25 - I do hereby in his majesty's name, offer and promise his most gracious pardon, to all persons who shall forthwith lay down their arms, and return to the duties of peaceable subjects, excepting only from the benefit of such pardon, SAMUEL ADAMS and JOHN HANCOCK, whose offences are of too flagitious a nature to admit of any other consideration than that of condign punishment.
Seite 40 - Alike, when its gorgeous folds shall wanton, in lazy holiday triumph, on the summer breeze, and its tattered fragments be dimly seen through the clouds of war, may it be the joy and pride of the American heart ! First raised in the cause of right and liberty, in that cause alone may it forever spread out its streaming blazonry to the battle and the storm ! First raised in this humble village, and since borne victoriously across the continent and on every sea, may virtue, and freedom, and peace forever...
Seite 18 - I have referred, and in which the principles and opinions of the town are embodied, have few equals, and no superiors, among the productions of that class. They are well known to have proceeded from...
Seite 41 - Harrington, junior, was struck in front of his own house on the north of the common. His wife was at the window as he fell. With blood gushing from his breast, he rose in her sight, tottered, fell again, then crawled on hands and knees toward his dwelling ; she ran to meet him, but only reached him as he expired on their threshold. Caleb Harrington, who had gone into the...
Seite 42 - He was as good as his word — better. Having loaded his musket, he placed his hat, containing his ammunition, on the ground between his feet, in readiness for a second charge. At the second fire he was wounded, and sunk on his knees ; and in this condition discharged his gun.
Seite 59 - ... in this light, the debt she owes for all the knowledge, science and intelligence which she has received from Europe. He spoke of the manner in which civil and constitutional law was understood in the early days of our revolution. Those early appeals to arms, he said, were not accidental —they were founded in principle, and began in the place where we are now happily met together. The place, the details, so interesting, which we had heard from the voice of eloquence, had filled him with meditatiOD....
Seite 46 - Adams, through the smoke and flames of the 19th of April, beheld the sun of their country's independence arise, with healing in his wings. And you, brave and patriotic men, whose ashes are gathered in this humble place of deposit, no time shall rob you of the well-deserved meed of praise ! You too perceived not less clearly than the more illustrious patriots whose spirit you caught, that the decisive hour had come. You felt with them, that it could not, — must not be shunned. You had resolved it...

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