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Mrs. Snooks was decidedly of opinion, that I should wait till there was thirty per cent. profit, which would be fifteen thousand pounds gain, and which, added to the money deposited with the broker, would constitute a very handsome independence ; and she informed me she had always set her heart upon a country-house at Homerton, with a white front, green door, and brass plate, having our name engraved in large capitals. She is certainly a woman of taste, -indeed, she has a right to be so, since her connexions are of the first respectability, and her uncle's wife's sister would have been Lady Mayoress, had not her husband died of a surfeit at a Grocers' Hall dinner, only one week before the ninth of November ; but for my own part, I must say I particularly hate Homerton. Finding her, however, inflexible, I withdrew my opposition, not by any means out of deference to her opinion, for every man should be the master in his own house, but because I think people of property and respectability should never be seen wrangling and jangling like vulgar folks. Upon the same principle, I abandoned the idea of our setting up a gig, like Mr. Mordecai's, and yielded to her wish of having a one-horse chariot, like Mr. Lancet the apothecary, which she observed was truly keeping a carriage; and she resolved that her first visit should be to Mrs. Tibbs, on purpose to mortify her.

She herself now laughed heartily at the idea of my ever again putting on a white apron, and though she admitted Alderman Dewlap to be one of our best customers, she thought I had treated him quite right, since her family was as good as his any day in the year, and people whose heads are a little up in the world, have no occasion to keep their nose to the grindstone. This day we mutually agreed that in order to distinguish ourselves from a herd of poor relations. in very groveling situations, it was absolutely necessary to change our name, and as our money was made in the city, I proposed to take the addition of ville, observing that Snooksville had a very familyish sound; but my wife thought that a termination in real of any sort would only suggest the idea of a butcher. In confirmation of this, she reminded me that cousin Tom, who had been to Calais in the steam-boat, had there seen a large building, called the Hotel de Veal, because, as he was credibly informed, all the calves were slaughtered therein. I then hinted that we might append to my patronymic appellation the word 'scrip, which was the foundation of our fortune, and would form the very pleasing compound of Snookscrip; but as Mrs. S. thought that the founder of our prosperity ought to take precedence, it was finally agreed that we should be thenceforth called Scripsnooks, which, as she shrewdly remarked, was no change of the initial letter, and would consequently require no alteration in the marks upon our linen.

Saturday.- Found Capel Court this morning in what is technically called a panic-Poyais Scrip falling one per cent. every five minutes-all sellers and no buyers: the knowing ones who had been laying bets that it would be up ten per cent. this week, proving to have been secret sellers, and banging the market without mercy; while the Bulls were running about in great consternation seeking in vain for purchasers. All my imaginary profits having disappeared in about half an hour, I determined at all events not to sacrifice the money I had deposited with Mr. Mordecai, and scampered to his office in great perturbation of mind, that he might sell my Serip at any price he could get. Not finding him at the counting-house, I hurried back in a profuse perspiration to the Stock Exchange, and after repeating this process five or six times without catching a glimpse of him, had at last the unspeakable mortification of being informed that he was a lame duck, and that he had not only waddled but bolted; or in other words, that this “ remarkably prudent young gentleman” had run away, after having lost every thing, and had left nothing whatever to his numerous creditors, but his bright pea-green tilbury, upon which, however, an attachment was lodged by

the groom in the sky-blue livery with silver shoulder-knots, for arrears of wages !

Sneaked homewards, calling in my way to countermand a pipe of port, which I had been ass enough to order upon anticipation. Entered my shop as if I were going to be hung ; took up a dirty apron of Jem's which I tied round me, and began cutting up a sugar-loaf with great humility and compunction of spirit. My wife breaking into the shop as she beheld this apparition from the back parlour, I began to break to her our misfortune while I was breaking the sugar, when she flew into such a rage that I verily thought she would have finished by breaking my head. She would not have minded it so much, she said, but that she had lost the opportunity of mortifying Mrs. Tibbs, and that our best customer, Mr. Alderman Dewlap, had sent for his bill, declaring his intention of giving his custom to another shop. This she attributed to my impertinence, and insisted upon my writing him a submissive apology, which I sturdily refused doing, declaring I would be the master of my own house, and that though I was ruined, I would not be humbled or hen-pecked. Very angry words ensued, but I carried my point with a high hand, for instead of writing to the Alderman as she ordered, I called upon him, and made him a very humble apology in person.

STANZAS.
“ WHEN shall we two meet again ?"-

Oh ask the breeze that bears me on
Over yon blue and pathless main,

And it will tell how soon!
Go ask the waves that roar

Round my bark as she holds her way,
And as they wildly pour

On the beach where thy footsteps stray-
While the rude wind whistles loud,

And their crests are white with foam,
They may tell that, without a shroud,

I have sought my last cold home.
And will those bright eyes shed

A tear on the sullen wave,
When it tells that I have sped

To a cheerless lonely grave ?-
“When shall we two meet again?”

And must I answer thee?
Can the pilot tell thee when

Tempests shall vex the sea ?
Though his bark sail smoothly on,

And the port seem just in view,
Yet their rage may burst anon

And o'erwhelm his gallant crew.

I have watch'd yon clear blue sky,

I have mark'd the glassy main,
And have told when storms were nigh,-

But I cannot tell thee when!
“When shall we two meet again?”—

And must I answer thee? Oh ne'er! oh ne'er! till when

Our spirits are set free! Then the evils being over

That around us now are cast, Together they may hover

And smile upon the past. “ And when shall we two meet?”

There is something in the tone
That asks, though passing sweet,

Telling me I am lone.
Go ask the destined wretch,

If from the upas-tree
He still has hopes to fetch

Its fruitage, and be free :-
And if a smile shall beam

Upon his pallid face,
Through which his soul may seem

To thee to answer “ Yes;"-
Oh let thine eyes impart

That ray of hope to me, And then this aching heart

Shall bless, and cling to thee-
As one, whom waves have torn

From his reeling vessel's side,
To the plank on which he is borne

Afloat o'er the waters wide.
" When shall we two meet again?”-

Oh in that question all
That tell of grief and pain

Upon my spirit fall!
In childhood first we met,

When our hearts were free from care,
And I remember yet

How those days were bright and fair ; And hadst thou ask'd me then,

As we sported merrily,
“ When shall we meet again ?”

I could have answer'd thee.
But those words have now a tone

So sad, so drear to me,
For they speak of days long gone,

And can I answer thee?
As the passing bell that tolls

To the prisoner doom'd to die, When each echo as it rolls

Through his cell tells his hour is nigh; So sound those words to me,

Like that heavy and slow death-bell, And I only can answer thee

In that one wild word, “Farewell !"

Π. Σ.

ration to the Stock Exchange, and after repeating this process five or six times without catching a glimpse of him, had at last the unspeakable mortification of being informed that he was a lame duck, and that he had not only waddled but bolted ; or in other words, that this “ remarkably prudent young gentleman” had run away, after having lost every thing, and had left nothing whatever to his numerous creditors, but his bright pea-green tilbury, upon which, however, an attachment was lodged by the groom in the sky-blue livery with silver shoulder-knots, for arrears of wages !

Sneaked homewards, calling in my way to countermand a pipe of port, which I had been ass enough to order upon anticipation. Entered my shop as if I were going to be hung; took up a dirty apron of Jem's which I tied round me, and began cutting up a sugar-loaf with great humility and compunction of spirit. My wife breaking into the shop as she beheld this apparition from the back parlour, I began to break to her our misfortune while I was breaking the sugar, when she flew into such a rage that I verily thought she would have finished by breaking my head. She would not have minded it so much, she said, but that she had lost the opportunity of mortifying Mrs. Tibbs, and that our best customer, Mr. Alderman Dewlap, had sent for his bill, declaring his intention of giving his custom to another shop. This she attributed to my impertinence, and insisted upon my writing him a submissive apology, which I sturdily refused doing, declaring I would be the master of my own house, and that though I was ruined, I would not be humbled or hen-pecked. Very angry words ensued, but I carried my point with a high hand, for instead of writing to the Alderman as she ordered, I called upon him, and made him a very humble apology in person.

STANZAS.
“ When shall we two meet again?”—

Oh ask the breeze that bears me on
Over yon blue and pathless main,

And it will tell how soon!
Go ask the waves that roar

Round my bark as she holds her way,
And as they wildly pour

On the beach where thy footsteps stray-
While the rude wind whistles loud,

And their crests are white with foam,
They may tell that, without a shroud,

I have sought my last cold home.
And will those bright eyes shed

A tear on the sullen wave,
When it tells that I have sped

To a cheerless lonely grave ?-
“When shall we two meet again?”

And must I answer thee?
Can the pilot tell thee when

Tempests shall vex the sea ?
Though his bark sail smoothly on,

And the port seem just in view,
Yet their rage may burst anon

And o'erwhelm bis gallant crew.

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