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CONTENTS.

sumption and Longevity; Man's proper Place in Creation, 35.

NATURE OF THE SOUL .

36–49

On the Soul, by the Ancients, 36.-

The Imprisoned Soul, 38.—Th

Soul and the Magnetic Needle, 39.-Symbols of the Soul, 41.-

Personality of God—the Soul God's great Organ, 42.-Pre-exist-

ence of Souls, 43.—Transmigration of Souls and Sacredness o

Animals, 49.

3

SPIRITUAL LIFE.

50—63

Spiritual Reclamation; “Excelsior,” 50.—Notions of Angels, 51.-

Spiritual Natures, 55.-Permanent Impressions by Spiritual Powers,

57.-Materialism and Spiritualism-Personal Identity, 59.-

Mesmerism and Somnambulism, 61.-Clairvoyance, 63.

MENTAL OPERATIONS

64–93

Mind and Body, 64.—Mental Processes, of which we are unconscious,

65.—The Voltaic Battery, Electric Eel, and Brain of Man ; A

Galvanized Human Body, 66.-Changes in the Nervous System,

67.-Working of the Brain, 68.—What is Memory ? 69.—How does

the Function of Memory take place ? 71.—Persistence of Impres-
sions, 71.- Value of Memory–Registration, 73.- Decay of Memory,

74.-Intuitions, 75.—What is Genius ? 76. -Mental Abstraction, 77.

Effect of Emotion on the Intellect, 78.-Melancholy or Poetic

114

PHENOMENA OF DEATH

120-174

Hours fatal to Life, 120.--Premonitions of Death-Death of Lord

Lyttelton, 130.-Death of Archbishop Leighton, 132.-Old Age

and Death, 133.-Death at Will ; Sleep and Death, 134.—Does

the Soul Sleep? Contrition of the Antients at the point of Death,

136.—Man's Reluctance to think of God, 137.—State of Mind pre-

ceding Death, 140.—How Man dies, 141.-Death from Heart

Disease, 148. -Broken Hearts, 149. — The Death-bed, by Owen

Feltham, 150.--Death-bed Kepentance, 151.—The Last Moments

and Words of Distinguished Persons, 153.-The Soul going forth

from the Body, 158. -The Passing Bell, 160.-Beauty of Death,

162.-Grief for the Dead, 163.-Interferences of the Dead with the

Living, 164.- Death Customs ; Antiquity of Burial Clubs, 165.-

“God's Acre," 167.—Emblems on Tombs ; Antiseptic Burial Soils,

167.-Decay of the Human Body, 168.—Emblem of the Resurrec-

tion, 169.-Flowers on Graves, 170.

SIN AND PUNISHMENT

174–181

The Earliest Sin ; 'the Great Sin, 174.-Special Providences, 175.

Nemesis, or Retribution, 176.-Representations of “the Devil,”

178.-Picture of Hell-Utter Darkness, 179.-The Wheel of Eternal

Punishment, 181.

THE CRUCIFIXION OF OUR LORD .

182-189

Crucifixion, 183.-Knowledge of God before the time of Christ, 187.

– “Christ the Moral Saviour,” 188.

THE END OF THE WORLD FORETOLD

190-194

Epidemic Terrors, 190.-Geological Future of the Universe, 193.

MAN AFTER DEATH.

195—202

The Dead know not anything, 195.--Prayers for the Dead, 195.-

Condition of Man after Death, 196 _“To the Holy Spirit," 200.-

Life after Death-Re-union of the Soul and Body, 201.

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THE CHRISTIAN RESURRECTION

212–217

The Resurrection, 212.–Resurrection of the same Body, 216.

THE FUTURE STATES

218–219

The Day of Judgment, 218.-Happiness of the Blessed, 219. ,

THE RECOGNITION OF EACH OTHER BY THE BLESSED,

220-230

Bishops King and Mant, 220.-David, St. Paul, the Transfiguration,

Lazarus in Abraham's bosom, 221.—Ulysses, Achilles, Agamemnon,

Antigone, Darius, Socrates, 222.-Æneas and Anchises, Cicero,

223.-American Chiefs, Hindoos, Kings of Dahomey and Guinea ;

Love of the Dead ; Cyprian at Carthage, 224. — Translation of

Enoch, 225.—“Marriages are made in Heaven ;” “Business of the

Saints in Heaven,” 226.—The New Heavens and the Earth;

Bishop Mant, 227.-Bishop Courtenay, 228 and 229; Abodes of

the Blest, 230.

ADVERSARIA

231-257

Study of the Bible, 231.-Serpent Worship, 233.-Symbolical Figures

from Nineveh, 234. — Evidences of Christianity ; Changes in Opinion,

235.--Christian Revelation, why first given to the West; Holy

Thorn at Glastonbury, 236.- The Christian Mission, 238.-

The

True Course of Christian Life; True and False Buddhism, 240.-

Platonic Love, 243.—Platonism and Christianity, 244.—Religion

happily adapted to the Mind of Man, 245.—Power of Religion over

Difficulties, 247.–Attributes of the Deity, 248.-On Atheism, by

South; Preparing for another World, 249.- Remoteness of Úni-

versal Christianity, 251.- Eternal Punishment, 252.-Boyish or

Manly Happiness ; God's Ancient People, 253.- Latin or Mediæval

Christianity, 255. — Origin of the Litany; Vital Force ; What is

Materialism? 256.

PILGRIM'S PROGRESS, THE

258—261

Authorship of, 25.—Bunyan's Vindication, 258. - Dr. Adam Clarke ;

- Voyage of the Wandering Knight, 260; Bunyan's Escapes, 261.

APPENDIX

262–272

Lambton Family Tradition.-Lord Bacon's Dream.—Last Sonnet

Mrs. Hemans'.-Chartley Tradition.—Lord Chesterfield.-Dr.John-

son on Death.-Latin Hymn.—Capt. Kidd and Lord Byron.-

Grimaldi's dread of Friday.-Cawnpore, Death at. -Watching for

the Dead.—Dirge by Faber,

LITERARY HISTORY OF MADMEN.

267—272

“There are those to whom a sense of religion has come in storm and tempest; and there are those whom it has summoned amid scenes of revelry and idle vanity; there are those who have heard its still small voice' amid rural leisure and placid contentment. But perhaps the knowlege which cometh not to err is most frequently impressed upon the mind during seasons of affliction; and tears are the softening showers which cause the seed of heaven to spring and take root in the human heart.”—Sir Walter Scott.

MYSTERIES,

ETO.

Life and Time.

WHAT IS LIFE ?

We're ill by these Grammarians us'd;
We are abus'd by Words, grossly abus'd;

From the Maternal Tomb,

To the Grave's fruitful Womb,
We call her Life, but Life's a name

That nothing here can truly claim. COWLEY, in a note to his Pindaric Ode, whence the above lines are quoted, says:

Plato, in Timæus, makes this distinction: “That which is, but is not generated; and that which is generated, but is not.” This he took from Trismegistus, whose sentence of God was written in the Egyptian temples, “I am all that was, is, or shall be.” This doctrine of Plato, that nothing truly is but God, is approved by all the Fathers. Simplicius explains it thus : That which has more degrees of privation, or not-being than of being, (which is the case of all creatures,) is not properly said to be; and again, that which is a perpetual fieri, or making, never is quite made, and therefore, never properly is.

Leaving the old "Grammarian,” we pass to the science of our own times. M. Geoffroy St. Hilaire, in his Histoire Naturelle générale des Règnes Organiques, in the chapter on the definitions of Life, refutes the common mistake of supposing that vital force suspends or destroys physical action. If these vitalists had but taken the trouble of decomposing each complex question into its elements, instead of cutting the knot which they could not loosen, they would have seen their error. Thus, an animal, while living, “resists” cold, does not "obey” the physical laws of temperature, but keeps constantly above the temperature of the surrounding medium. When dead, this resistance ceases. Does this

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