The Cosna-Nowitna Region, Alaska

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1918 - Geology - 54 pages
 

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Page 270 - An act concerning certain fisheries of the United States and for the regulation and government of the fishermen employed therein," and during the continuance of the said act; and further, that this act shall continue in force for two years, and from thence until the end of the next session of Congress, and no longer.
Page 270 - States of America in Congress assembled, That from and after the first day of January next a duty of twenty cents per bushel shall be laid, imposed, and collected upon all salt imported from any foreign port or place into the United States. In calculating the said duty every fifty-six pounds of salt shall be computed as equal to one bushel. And the said duty shall be collected in the same manner, and under the same regulations, as other duties laid on the importation of foreign goods, wares, and...
Page 270 - I have the honor to send you herein enclosed, two copies duly authenticated, of an Act concerning certain fisheries of the United States, and for the regulation and government of the fishermen employed therein...
Page 50 - LANE, AC: The geology of lower Michigan with reference to deep borings, Mich.
Page 124 - Considering the great value of a workable deposit of potash, it seems worth the while to call attention to another circumstance in connection with these observations. In either direction north or south from Spur the formations lie practically horizontal for at least a hundred miles, and the potash-bearing horizon, whether it be such or not in other places, must be at about the same depth as here, in these directions. It seems to the writer that the general conditions indicated in this boring, the...
Page 199 - The freshening of a lake by desiccation may be illustrated in all its stages in the various basins that have been examined in the Far West. A lake after a long period of concentration becomes strongly saline, and finally evaporates to dryness, leaving a deposit of various salts over its bed. During the rainy season the bottom of the basin is converted into a shallow lake of brine which deposits a layer of sediment; on evaporating to dryness, during the succeeding arid season, a stratum of salt is...
Page 22 - Oatka-Genesee district, which was visited by the writer, the salt is usually found at levels varying from 550 to 750 feet below the surface of the Onondaga limestone. Exceptions to this are few in number. The upper surface of the Onondaga has been taken as the datum plane to determine the relative position of the salt beds, because it is invariably recognized by the driller. Its persistent character and the abundance of chert scattered...
Page 199 - ... evaporation of inclosed lakes are common in the Great Basin. In the Lahontan basin deposits of this character resulting directly from the evaporation of a former lake are nowhere to be found. Wherever the lake sediments have been examined, however, they have been found to be charged with salts of presumably the same character as those that were most common in the waters of the former lake. It is beneath the level floors of the valleys and lake basins that the most soluble salts formerly dissolved...
Page 124 - This is 666 ft. higher than the elevation at Cisco, about 120 miles to the east-southeast. A line connecting these two points may be taken to follow the direction of the general dip of the formations to the west. The bottom of the well may be taken to represent the beds outcropping at Cisco. On this assumption, the general dip between Cisco and Spur, a distance of 120 miles, will be equal to the depth of the Spur well less the difference in elevation of the two places. This gives us a dip to the...
Page 133 - Hokanson, in deepening these springs in 1902, encountered a formation of rock salt 6 feet below the surface and this has been penetrated for a thickness of 20 feet without reaching the bottom. The exceptional purity of the salt, its cheapness of production, and the probability of railroad connections in the near future fend interest to the deposits of the entire district.

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