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ference on the part of the government, was suffered to sheathe his sword and retire to the walks of civil life.

At the height of this contention Gen. Butler, evidently for his own glorification, conceived the idea of issuing his infamous order relative to the conduct of the Seventh at Baton Rouge. As soon as I became aware of his intention I called upon Gen. Phelps, who, as might have been expected, warmly espoused our cause, and unhesitatingly denounced Butler's fell design as utterly unworthy of a commander inspired either with patriotism, fairness or decency. Whether or not Gen. Phelps’ well known interest in the regiment operated to incite Gen. Butler to persist in his malicious purpose

I know not, but from the vindictiveness of his character it would not be strange if it was an element which, in his footings of a grand total for a cause of offence, was not entirely overlooked. Gen. Phelps' views as to Gen. Butler's conduct in this particular are well illustrated by the following extracts from a letter I recently received from him: “ The general (referring to Butler) who gave a fatal impres“sion of trade and politics to his command instead of stimu

lating their patriotism and soldiership, began quarreling “ with officers of the Seventh almost before it had fairly “ landed at Ship Island, and he seems to have kept it up to “ the last, pursuing the Seventh through the strife and havoc “ of battle, where he was not personally present, and under “ circumstances of difficulty, crowned with success, where a

generous spirit would have been disposed to overlook minor “ faults, even if they had been committed. What his “motives were for thus pursuing the Seventh, and seeking

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GENERAL PHELPS-CARROLTON.

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“ to incite variance between that regiment and the Twenty“ first Indiana regiment, I cannot say, but it is evident that “ if he (Butler) were to run for the Presidency in the en"suing election of 1864, the large electoral vote of Indiana

might be of great moment to him, and that it would be a good bargain to win it even at the expense of losing the

Whig vote of Vermont. But whatever the objects of Gen. “Butler may have been, they were little in accord with the " occasion that called for military service in the Southwest

in 1862, which was the most important theatre of action • of the whole war. He gave a very unfortunate direction

to the service there which the government subsequently “ endeavored to remedy by sending to that quarter general “after general and commission after commission with but " little effect. I can hardly think that it was necessary for “ the government to make such disastrous concessions to the

Democracy as to employ Gen. Butler in the Southwest at " that period. He exacted from the government terms

altogether too advantageous to himself and party, as an " old Democrat, to be compatible with a proper final settle“ment of the war issues before the country. I doubt if " there was an officer, even of the rebel army, who has occa" sioned the Republic so much injury as he has done."

It is much to be regretted that General Phelps was not assigned to the command of the troops on active duty in the field. Had he been sent to the front I believe the outcome of our subsequent operations on the river would have been far more glorious, and I am confident our regiment would have had accorded to it the commendation and praise which it so justly

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CARROLTON-DEPARTURE FOR BATON ROUGE.

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earned, and which its faithful and heroic services so richly merited.

While at Carrolton, owing to the nature of the country, it was impossible to do very much drilling. Lieut.-Col. Fullam in his letter above referred to, speaking of the experience of the regiment there says. “ of ground appropriated to the troops gave us no oppor"tunity for drill in battalions, which we never had while " there. Soon after our arrival the rising water from a

crevasse in the levee made it necessary for us to spend our “ time in trying to protect our camp from its incursions; we “ succeeded in this but the stench from decomposing animal “ and vegetable matter left by the water when it receded “produced much sickness among us and we were finally “ forced to move our camp and occupy a much smaller space nearer the river. May 22d, Col. Roberts was taken sick

* * which left me in command.” And in speaking of the circumstances attending the departure of the regiment for Baton Rouge he says.

" This “ state of affairs continued until the 6th of June when I re“ ceived an order from Gen. Butler to prepare the regiment “ to embark immediately on board the steamer · Herville’with “ the tents of the regiment, and officers' baggage, limited to a

valise, bag or knapsack to each. I prepared the regiment “ immediately according to the order, and the next morning

was ready, but after waiting for the boat until the morning of the 15th, I went to New Orleans to see Gen. Butler to represent to him the condition of the regiment, ascertain our destination and if possible obtain leave to take more

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ARRIVAL AT BATON ROUGE.

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baggage than allowed by the order, in which I thought " there must be some mistake, since the trip was to be made

by steamer, and our baggage could have as well been taken

as left behind. I was at Gen. Butler's office when he “ entered it in the morning, sent in my name immediately,

requesting that I might see him a moment, but was forced “ to return to camp at night without having obtained an in“ terview. When I arrived at camp I found the ‘ Iberville' “ had been sent up during the day with an order to embark “ the troops immediately; everything was nearly ready and

hastily preparing myself I went on board without any order written or oral where I was to go, or what I was to do.

"We proceeded up the river, and in the

" " afternoon of the next day the ‘Iberville’ stopped at Baton

Rouge. Knowing that Gen. Williams was in command of

our forces I went to his quarters, and informed him that “ although I had received no orders to report to him, the

regiment was there, and I should be happy to receive orders " from him. He said he had been informed that we were “ coming, and directed me to disembark the troops."

About this time I was ordered to join the regiment at Baton Rouge, and accordingly left Fort Pike taking with me Company B, Capt. Cronan, leaving C and a portion of D company to garrison that post under the command of Capt. Porter.

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CHAPTER II.

VICKSBURG CAMPAIGN.-GRAND GULF.-EXPERIENCE OF COL.

ROBERTS AND LIEUT. CLARK IN ASCENDING THE RIVER.

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N the 19th of June the regiment was ordered to em

bark on transports, to take part in an expedition against Vicksburg under Gen. Williams.

A few weeks before, Gen. Williams, with about 1,500 men, acting in conjunction with the naval forces under Admiral Farragut, had ascended the river as far as Vicksburg on a reconnoissance, and on his return had reported that he saw no chance of taking the place with the troops at his disposal, even with the aid of the navy, as it was heavily fortified and manned, and the enemy, in addition to the regular garrison, had at least 30,000 men within an hour's call.

Notwithstanding this adverse report we were expected, with a land force of not exceeding 3,500 men, to take Vicks

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