Memoirs of the Reign of George the Second: From His Accession to the Death of Queen Caroline, Band 2

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John Murray, 1848 - 609 Seiten

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Seite 100 - I am sick to death of all this foolish stuff, and wish with all my heart that the devil may take all your Bishops, and the devil take your minister, and the devil take the Parliament, and the devil take the whole island, provided I can get out of it and go to Hanover.
Seite 29 - English jockey ride, nor were any English horses fit to be drove or fit to be ridden; no Englishman knew how to come into a room, nor any Englishwoman how to dress herself, nor were there any diversions in England, public or private, nor any man or woman in England whose conversation was to be borne — the one, as he said, talking of nothing but their dull politics, and the others of nothing but their ugly clothes. Whereas at Hanover all these things were in the utmost perfection. The men were patterns...
Seite 432 - The professions you have lately made in your letters of your particular regard to me are so contradictory to all your actions, that I cannot suffer myself to be imposed upon by them.
Seite 472 - I will give it you under my hand, if ' you are in any fear of my relapsing, that my dear firstborn is ' the greatest ass, and the greatest liar, and the greatest canaille, ' and the greatest beast in the whole world ; and that I most ' heartily wish he was out of it...
Seite 360 - Bolingbroke's, who, of all those rascals and knaves that 'have been lying against me these ten years, has certainly the best parts and the most knowledge: he is a scoundrel, but he is a scoundrel of a higher class than Chesterfield. Chesterfield is a little teatable scoundrel, that tells little womanish lies to make quarrels in families; and tries to make women lose their reputations, and make their husbands beat them, without any object but to give himself airs; as if anybody could believe a woman...
Seite 433 - In the mean time- it is my pleasure that you leave St. James's with all your family, when it can be done without prejudice or inconvenience to the Princess. " I shall for the present leave to the Princess the care of my grand-daughter, until a proper time calls upon me to consider of her education.
Seite 51 - Hervey, turned to the Queen, and with a good deal of vehemence, poured out an unintelligible torrent of German, to which the Queen made not one word of reply, but knotted on till she tangled her thread, then snuffed the candles that stood on the table before her, and snuffed one of them out ; upon which the King, in English, began a new dissertation upon her Majesty, and took her awkwardness for his text.
Seite 521 - No situation of distress can soften him enough to make him forget to hate one moment." This advice Lord Hervey conveyed to the King, who took it with as much reluctance as his Lordship brought it ; though not with so good an excuse to himself for sacrificing his inclination to his fear, especially when he found it made the Queen so uneasy that she often asked if nobody would turn those ravens out of the house, who were only there to watch her death, and would gladly tear her to pieces whilst she...

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