The Liberty of Printing: An Address at the Second Annual Congress of the National Liberal League at Syracuse, Oct. 26, 1878

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National defense association, 1880 - 23 Seiten
 

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Seite 41 - ... every written or printed card, letter, circular, book, pamphlet, advertisement, or notice of any kind giving information directly or indirectly, where, or how, or of whom, or by what means any of the hereinbefore-mentioned matters, articles or things may be obtained or made...
Seite 41 - ... any person who shall knowingly deposit, or cause to be deposited, for mailing or delivery, anything declared by this section to be non-mailable...
Seite 51 - ... any article or thing intended or adapted for any indecent or immoral use or nature, nor any written or printed card, circular, book, pamphlet, advertisement or notice of any kind giving information, directly or indirectly, where or how, or of whom, or by what means...
Seite 6 - Who does not see that the same authority which can establish Christianity, in exclusion of all other Religions, may establish with the same ease any particular sect of Christians, in exclusion of all other Sects?
Seite 35 - The constitutional guaranty of the right of the people to be secure in their papers against unreasonable searches and seizures extends to their papers, thus closed against inspection, wherever they may be.
Seite 51 - ... is hereby declared to be nonmailable matter and shall not be conveyed in the mails or delivered from any post office or by any letter carrier.
Seite vii - Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political; peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none; the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns and the surest bulwarks against antirepublican tendencies; the preservation of the General Government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home and safety abroad...
Seite 36 - No letter or circular concerning (Illegal) lotteries, so-called gift concerts, or other similar enterprises, offering prizes, or concerning schemes devised and Intended to deceive and defraud the public for the purpose of obtaining money under false pretenses, shall be carried in the mail.
Seite 15 - The broad statement that the federal government can exercise no powers except those specifically enumerated in the Constitution, and such implied powers as are necessary and proper to carry into effect the enumerated powers, is categorically true only in respect of our internal affairs.
Seite 24 - ... the transportation of printed matter in the mail, which is open to examination, so as to interfere in any manner with the freedom of the press. Liberty of circulating is as essential to that freedom as liberty of publishing; indeed, without the circulation, the publication would be of little value. If, therefore, printed matter be excluded from the mails, its transportation in any other way cannot be forbidden by Congress.

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