The Canadian Journal of Industry, Science and Art, Band 8

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Canadian Institute., 1863
 

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Seite 103 - When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained; What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him? For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour. Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands ; thou hast put all things under his feet...
Seite 389 - In the time of the Romans the Danish Isles were covered, as now, with magnificent beech forests. Nowhere in the world does this tree flourish more luxuriantly than in Denmark, and eighteen centuries seem to have done little or nothing towards modifying the character of the forest vegetation.
Seite 77 - I think it extremely probable that further investigation will tend to the conclusion that the vertical or flattened occiput, instead of being a typical characteristic, pertains entirely to the class of artificial modifications of the natural cranium familiar to the American ethnologist alike in the disclosures of ancient graves, and in the customs of widely separated living tribes.
Seite 368 - Fig. 1), covered with short spreading tufts of white hairs, with a row of eight black tufts on the back, and two long, slender, black pencils on the fourth and on the tenth ring. The tufts along the top of the back converge on each side, so as to form a kind of ridge or crest ; and the warts, from which these tufts proceed, are oblong-oval and transverse, while the other warts on the body are round. The hairs on the fore part of the body are much longer than the rest, and hang over the head ; the...
Seite 129 - I had almost omitted the remark, that this irregularity of form is common in, and peculiar to, American crania."-^ The latter remark, however, is too wide a generalization. I have repeatedly noted the like unsymmetrical characteristics in the brachycephalic crania of the Scottish barrows ; and it has occurred to my mind, on more than one occasion, whether such may not furnish an indication of some partial compression, dependent, it may be, on the mode of nurture in infancy, having tended, in their...
Seite 389 - Scotch fir prevailed, and already there were human inhabitants in those old pine forests. How many generations of each species of tree flourished in succession before the pine was supplanted by the oak, and the oak by the beech, can be but...
Seite 154 - I at first found it difficult to conceive that the original rounded skull of the Indian could be changed into this fantastic form ; and was led to suppose that the latter was an artificial elongation of a head remarkable for its length and narrowness. I even supposed that the long-headed Peruvians were a more ancient people than the Inca tribes, and distinguished from them by their cranial configuration. In this opinion I was mistaken. Abundant means of observation and comparison have since convinced...
Seite 74 - ... from fluids, and afterwards, in great measure, are turned into dry earth by putrefaction; and a sort of slime is always found to settle at the bottom of putrefied fluids; and hence it is that the bulk of the solid earth is continually increased; and the fluids, if they are not supplied from without, must be in a continual decrease, and quite fail at last.
Seite 398 - ... we wish to explain by them ; and in the last place, we ought to be able to show that no other known causes are competent to produce these phenomena. If we can succeed in satisfying these three conditions we shall have demonstrated our hypothesis ; or rather I ought to say, we shall have proved it as far as certainty is possible for us ; for, after all, there is no one of our surest convictions which may not be upset, or at any rate modified by a further accession of knowledge.
Seite 156 - Chi nooks ; but it is less generally known that a slight pressure is often applied to the occiput by the Polynesians, in conformity with the Malay standard."* Dr. Nott, in describing the skull of a Kanaka of the Sandwich Islands who died at the Marine Hospital at Mobile, mentions his being struck by its singular occipital formation ; but this he learned was due to an artificial flattening which the Islander had stated to his medical attendants in the hospital, was habitually practised in his family...

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