The Raft of Odysseus: The Ethnographic Imagination of Homer's Odyssey

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Oxford University Press, 05.04.2001 - 256 Seiten
The Raft of Odysseus looks at the fascinating intersection of traditional myth with an enthnographically-viewed Homeric world. Carol Dougherty argues that the resourcefulness of Odysseus as an adventurer on perilous seas served as an example to Homer's society which also had to adjust in inventive ways to turbulent conditions. The fantastic adventures of Odysseus act as a prism for the experiences of Homer's own listeners--traders, seafarers, storytellers, soldiers--and give us a glimpse into their own world of hopes and fears, 500 years after the Iliadic events were supposed to have happened.

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Inhalt

Ships and Song
19
Poetic Profit
38
Travel and Song
61
Phaeacia Gateway to the Ethnographic Imagination
79
A Brave New World
81
Phaeacians and Phoenicians Overseas Trade
102
Phaeacians and Cyclopes Overseas Settlement
122
Phaeacians and Euboeans Greeks Overseas
143
Home at Last
159
Odysseus Returned and Ithaca Refounded
161
From Raft to Bed
Notes
Bibliography
3
Index
9
Urheberrecht

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Seite 86 - I' the commonwealth I would by contraries Execute all things ; for no kind of traffic Would I admit ; no name of magistrate ; Letters should not be known : riches, poverty, And use of service, none ; contract, succession, Bourn, bound of land, tilth, vineyard, none : No use of metal, corn, or wine, or oil : No occupation ; all men idle, all ; And women too ; but innocent and pure : No sovereignty : — Seb.
Seite 86 - All things in common nature should produce Without sweat or endeavour: treason, felony, Sword, pike, knife, gun, or need of any engine, Would I not have; but nature should bring forth, Of its own kind, all foison, all abundance, To feed my innocent people.
Seite 8 - ... of what he is doing ("practicing a burlesque of a friend faking a wink to deceive an innocent into thinking a conspiracy is in motion") lies the object of ethnography: a stratified hierarchy of meaningful structures in terms of which twitches, winks, fakewinks, parodies, rehearsals of parodies are produced, perceived, and interpreted, and without which they would not...
Seite 84 - Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground ; long heath, brown furze, any thing : The wills above be done ! but I would fain die a dry death.
Seite 27 - Their ships are wretched affairs, and many of them get lost ; for they have no iron fastenings, and are only stitched together with twine made from the husk of the Indian nut. They beat this husk until it becomes like horse-hair, and from that they spin twine, and with this stitch the planks of the ships together. It keeps well, and is not corroded by the sea-water, but it will not stand well in a storm.
Seite 13 - tis true, I must be here confin'd by you, Or sent to Naples. Let me not, Since I have my dukedom got, And pardon'd the deceiver, dwell In this bare island by your spell; But release me from my bands With the help of your good hands. Gentle breath of yours my sails Must fill, or else my project fails, Which was to please.
Seite 8 - Consider, he says, two boys rapidly contracting the eyelids of their right eyes. In one, this is an involuntary twitch; in the other, a conspiratorial signal to a friend. The two movements are, as movements, identical; from an I-am-a-camera, "phenomenalistic...
Seite 5 - Meanwhile, the conception of space that has been developed here suggests that a model of political culture appropriate to our own situation will necessarily have to raise spatial issues as its fundamental organizing concern.
Seite 5 - I mean to signal by that term processes that so revolutionize the objective qualities of space and time that we are forced to alter, sometimes in quite radical ways, how we represent the world to ourselves.

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