Live and Learn: A Guide for All who Wish to Speak and Write Correctly : Particularly Intended as a Book of Reference for the Solution of Difficulties Connected with Grammar, Composition, Punctuation, Etc., Etc. ...

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Dick & Fitzgerald, 1853 - 213 Seiten

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Seite 119 - Night, sable goddess ! from her ebon throne, In rayless majesty, now stretches forth Her leaden sceptre o'er a slumbering world.
Seite 111 - The reverend champion stood. At his control, Despair and anguish fled the struggling soul ; Comfort came down the trembling wretch to raise, And his last faltering accents whispered praise.
Seite 21 - Or lose thyself in the continuous woods Where rolls the Oregon and hears no sound Save his own dashings...
Seite 127 - Alas! my noble boy ! that thou shouldst die ! Thou, who wert made so beautifully fair ! That death should settle in thy glorious eye, And leave his stillness in this clustering hair ! How could he mark thee for the silent tomb ! My proud boy, Absalom...
Seite 109 - Does life appear miserable that gives thee opportunities of earning such a reward? Is death to be feared that will convey thee to so happy an existence? -Think not man was made in vain, who has such an eternity reserved for him.
Seite 118 - The changing spirits' rise and fall; We know that these were felt by him, For these are felt by all. He suffered — but his pangs are o'er; Enjoyed— but his delights are fled ; Had friends — his friends are now no more ; And foes — his foes are dead. He loved — but whom he loved the grave Hath lost in its unconscious womb : O she was fair!
Seite 29 - An irregular verb is one, which does not form its past tense and perfect participle by adding d or ed to the present; as, present, see; past, saw; perfect participle, seen; go, went, gone.
Seite 114 - Whose beard descending swept his aged breast ; The ruined spendthrift, now no longer proud, Claimed kindred there, and had his claims allowed ; The broken soldier, kindly bade to stay, Sat by his fire and talked the night away, Wept o'er his wounds or tales of sorrow done, Shouldered his crutch and showed how fields were won.
Seite 201 - Yet I have, perhaps, as little personal interest in the event as any one here. There is, I believe, no member who will not think his chance to be a witness of the consequences greater than mine. If, however, the vote should pass to reject, and a spirit should rise, as it will, with the public disorders, to make confusion worse confounded, even I, slender and almost broken as my hold upon life is, may outlive the government and constitution of my country.
Seite 57 - Pleased with his guests, the good man learn'd to glow, And quite forgot their vices in their woe ; Careless their merits or their faults to scan, His pity gave ere charity began.

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