The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Death of George the Third, Band 6

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Seite 292 - I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
Seite 292 - My loving people, we have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery. But I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people. Let tyrants fear. I have always so behaved myself that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and goodwill of my subjects...
Seite 381 - I that was wont to behold her riding like Alexander, hunting like Diana, walking like Venus, the gentle wind blowing her fair hair about her pure cheeks, like a nymph; sometimes sitting in the shade like a Goddess ; sometimes singing like an angel; sometimes playing like Orpheus. Behold the sorrow of this world ! Once amiss, hath bereaved me of all.
Seite 319 - Here die I, Richard Grenville, with a joyful and quiet mind, for that I have ended my life as a true soldier ought to do, that hath fought for his country, queen, religion, and honour...
Seite 413 - She answered with a faint voice, that as she had held a regal sceptre, she desired no other than a royal successor. Cecil requesting her to explain herself more particularly, she subjoined that she would have a king to succeed her ; and who should that be but her nearest kinsman, the King of Scots...
Seite 412 - ... this last appeal to her tenderness, and who ascribed the neglect of it to his invincible obstinacy, was, after much delay and many internal combats, pushed by resentment and policy to sign the warrant for his execution. The Countess of Nottingham falling into sickness, and affected with the near approach of death, was seized with remorse for her conduct ; and, having obtained a visit from the queen, she craved her pardon, and revealed to her the fatal secret. The queen, astonished with this incident,...
Seite 411 - Essex1, after his return from the fortunate expedition against Cadiz, observing the increase of the queen's fond attachment towards him, took occasion to regret, that the necessity of her service required him often to be absent from her person, and exposed him to all those ill offices, which his enemies, more assiduous in their attendance, could employ against him. She was moved with this tender jealousy ; and, making him the present of a ring, desired him to keep that pledge of...
Seite 303 - ... to be freed and eased of their oppression. Again, they take trees, which by law they cannot do ; timber trees, which are the beauty, countenance, and shelter of men's houses ; that men have long spared from their own purse and profit ; that men...
Seite 413 - Being then advised by the Archbishop of Canterbury to fix her thoughts upon God, she replied that she did so, nor did her mind in the least wander from him. Her voice soon after left her; her senses failed; she fell into a lethargic slumber, which continued some hours, and she expired gently, without farther struggle or convulsion (March 24), in the seventieth year of her age and forty-fifth of her reign.
Seite 272 - ... and, having given them her blessing, desired them to pray for her. One of her maids whom she had appointed for that purpose, covered her eyes with a handkerchief; she laid herself down without any sign of fear or trepidation ; and her head was severed from her body at two strokes by the executioner. He instantly held it up to the spectators, streaming with blood and agitated with the convulsions of death : the dean of Peterborough alone exclaimed, " So perish all queen Elizabeth's enemies...

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