The Resources of Tennessee, Volumes 5-6

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State Geological Survey, 1916 - Geology
Vol. 7, no. 1 and v. 9, no. 1 include the division's Administrative report for 1915/16-/1917/18.
 

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Page 83 - Morgan and SH McCrory; pages 17-43; postage, 1 cent. C. The Drainage Law of Tennessee; pages 45-74; postage, 1 cent. Bulletin No. 4 — Administrative Report of the State Geologist, 1910; Issued March, 1911; postage, 2 cents. Bulletin No. 5 — Clays of West Tennessee, by Wilbur A. Nelson; issued April, 1911; postage, 4 cents.
Page 157 - Smoky Mountains on the east and the Cumberland Plateau on the west, and covers about 9200 square miles.
Page 86 - Wateid to Prevent Floods, by AH Purdue. Drainage Problems of Wolf, Hatchie, and South Fork of Forked Deer Rivers, in West Tennessee, by LL Hidinger and Arthur E. Morgan. The Waste From Hillside Wash, by AH Purdue. No. 7 — Where May Oil and Gas Be Found in Tennessee? By Geo. H. Ashley. Spring Creek Oil Field, by MJ Munn. No. 8— The Monteagle Wonder Cave, by Wilbur A. Nelson. Cave Marble (Cave Onyx) In Tennessee, by CH Gordon.
Page 228 - Bar, by JA Switzer. Notes on Lead in Tennessee, by Wilbur A. Nelson. No. 4 — The Tennessee Academy of Science. The Preliminary Consideration of Water Power Projects, by JA Switzer. Lignite and Lignitic Clay in West Tennessee, by Wilbur A. Nelson. No. 5 — The Growth of Our Knowledge of Tennessee Geology, by LC Glenn. No. 6 — On the Impounding of Waters to Prevent Floods, by AH Purdue. Drainage Problems of Wolf, Hatchie, and South Fork of Forked Deer Rivers, in West Tennessee, by LL Hidinger...
Page 43 - ... Morgan Springs coal is slightly greater than in most of the other samples collected in this area, excepting those from the coal beds worked in the vicinity of Dayton. The percentage of sulphur in the coal is greater than in any of the other coals examined in the quadrangle. PUBLICATIONS OF SURVEY ISSUED. The following publications have been issued by the present Survey, and will be sent on request when accompanied by the necessary postage. To make it possible for libraries to complete their sets,...
Page 83 - October, 1910; 16 pages; postage, 1 cent. BULLETIN No. 3 — Drainage Reclamation in Tennessee ; 74 pages ; issued July, 1910; postage, 3 cents. A. Drainage Problems in Tennessee, by Geo. H. Ashley: pages 1-15; postage, 1 cent. B. Drainage of Rivers in Gibson County, Tennessee, by A. E. Morgan and SH McCrory ; pages 17-43 ; postage, 1 cent. C. The Drainage Law of Tennessee ; pages 45-74 ; postage, 1 cent. BULLETIN No. 4 — Administrative Report of the State Geologist, 1910; issued March, 1911 ;...
Page 15 - ... and for ice making. In 1902 or 1903 a well was drilled on the Swiver property, about 2 miles north of Wartrace, on the dirt road to Bellbuckle. This well is reported to have been drilled to a depth of 1,800 to 2,000 feet, but no data relative to it could be obtained. In 1904 or 1905 a well was also drilled for oil on the Matthew Skeen farm, about i mile north of Bellbuckle. This well is said to have been put down to a depth of 1,500 feet, but nothing is known of the results obtained. In 1906...
Page 128 - Much of the ore is siliceous, silica occuring principally as embedded chert and sometimes in the form of sand; but the percentage of siliceous material varies largely, portions of the ore being almost free from it, while the amount in other portions runs very high. The ore occurs in both the cellular and compact forms. Relatively little pot ore was seen, and most of it being of the solid chunk variety. Some limonite cemented sandstone was observed.
Page 147 - H. Ashley; pages 1-15; postage, 1 cent. B. Drainage of Rivers in Gibson County, Tennessee, by A. E. Morgan and SH McCrory; pages 17-43; postage, 1 cent. C. The Drainage Law of Tennessee; pages 45-74; postage, 1 cent. Bulletin No. 4 — Administrative Report of the State Geologist, 1910; issued March, 1911; postage, 2 cents. Bulletin No.
Page 135 - The pits are about 140 feet apart, and occur at different elevations on the spur. All show more or less ore in red clay. Three others have been sunk on a narrow part of the spur, northwest of this outcrop, near the main ridge. These are shallow, and show chiefly waterworn gravel and angular chert. "The ore is a light to dark-brown limonite and frequently contains some fine sand and small, irregular flakes of decomposed chert, but, on the whole, seems free of excessive siliceous impurities. It is...

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