The Miscellaneous Works of the Late Reverend and Learned Conyers Middleton ...

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Seite 284 - MSS., by their mutual assistance, do so settle the original text to the smallest nicety, as cannot be performed now in any Classic author whatever : and that out of a labyrinth of thirty thousand various readings, that crowd the pages of our present best editions, all put upon equal credit to the offence of many good persons ; this clue so leads and extricates us, that there will scarce be two hundred out of so many thousands that can deserve the least consideration.
Seite 224 - Christ, are very far from agreeing in the particular expressions and words, though they do agree in the substance of the discourses : but, if the words had been dictated by the Spirit of God, they must have agreed in them. For when St. Luke differs from St. Matthew in relating what our Saviour said, it is impossible that they should both relate it right as to the ver)words and form of expression ; but they both relate the substance of what he said.
Seite 413 - ... put upon equal credit, to the offence of many good persons, this clue so leads and extricates us, that there will scarce be two hundred out of so many thousands that can deserve the least consideration. IV. To confirm the lections which the author places in the text, he makes use of the old versions, Syriac, Coptic, Gothic, and /Ethiopic, and of all the Fathers, Greeks and Latins, within the first five centuries ; and he gives in his notes all the various readings (now known) within the said...
Seite 284 - And upon making the essay, he has succeeded in his conjecture beyond his expectation or even his hopes. III. The author believes that he has retrieved (except in very few places) the true exemplar of Origen, which was the standard to the most learned of the Fathers, at the time of the Council of Nice and two centuries after. And he is sure that the Greek and Latin MSS., by their mutual assistance, do so settle the original text to the smallest nicety, as cannot be performed now in any classic author...
Seite 328 - ... manuscripts of no great antiquity, such as the first editors could then procure ; and that now by God's providence there are MSS. in Europe (accessible, though with great charge) above a thousand years old in both languages ; believes he may do good service to common Christianity if he publishes a new edition of the Greek and Latin, not according to the recent and interpolated copies, but as represented in the most ancient and venerable MSS. in Greek and Roman capital letters.
Seite 152 - Some Remarks on a Reply to the Defence of the Letter to Dr. Wattrland. Wherein the Author's Sentiments, as to all the principal Points in Difpute are fully and clearly explained. Printed for J.
Seite 22 - Pagan nations, could never have thought " that cutting off of the foreskin (not to be performed " without great pain and hazard) could have been a reli" gious duty acceptable to a good and gracious God, " who makes nothing in vain, much less what requires " cutting off, even with extreme danger and anguish. " Had nature required such an operation, nature being " always the same, would still have required it.
Seite 117 - And so this supposed pact or contract, which maketh such a noise in the world, proveth to be but a squib, powder without shot, that giveth a crack, but vanisheth into air, and doth no execution.
Seite 224 - Words, tho' they do agree in the Subftance of the Dileourfes: but if the "Words had been diftated by the Spirit of God, they muft have agreed in them. For when St. Luke differs from St. Matthew, in relating what our Saviour...

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