The Phytologist: A Popular Botanical Miscellany, Band 2,Seiten 373-724

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George Luxford, Edward Newman
John van Voorst, 1846
 

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Seite 643 - It doth not love the shower, nor seek the cold : This neither is its courage nor its choice, But its necessity in being old. The sunshine may not cheer it, nor the dew; It cannot help itself in its decay; Stiff in its members, withered, changed of hue.
Seite 558 - ... though the whole plant was not larger than the top of one of my fingers, I could not contemplate the delicate conformation of its roots, leaves, and capsula, without admiration. Can that Being (thought I) who planted, watered, and brought to perfection, in this obscure part of the world, a thing which appears of so small importance, look with unconcern upon the situation and sufferings of creatures formed after his own image ? Surely not ! Reflections like these would not allow me to despair.
Seite 558 - Being (thought I) who planted, watered, and brought to perfection, in this obscure part of the world, a thing which appears of so small importance, look with unconcern upon the situation and sufferings of creatures formed after his own image ?—surely not! Reflections like these would not allow me to despair; I started up, and disregarding both hunger and fatigue, travelled forwards, assured that relief was at hand ; and I was not disappointed.
Seite 645 - Thus, when we are told that the leaves of a plant are occupied in decomposing carbonic acid, and preparing oxygen for us, we begin to look upon it with some such indifference as upon a gasometer. It has become a machine; some of our sense of its happiness is gone; its emanation of inherent life is no longer pure. The bending trunk, waving to and fro in the wind above the waterfall, is beautiful because it is happy, though it is perfectly useless to us.
Seite 558 - I mention this to show from what trifling circumstances the mind will sometimes derive consolation; for though the whole plant was not larger than the top of one of my fingers, I could not contemplate the delicate conformation of its roots, leaves, and capsula, without admiration. Can that Being, thought I, who planted, watered, and brought to perfection, in this obscure part of the world, a thing which appears of so small importance, look with unconcern upon the situation and sufferings of creatures...
Seite 450 - The whole of the tract here occupied by the sands, though not unpicturesque, is wild and barren in its aspect, destitute of wood, and producing only ferns, heaths, and furze. The surface is in fact, to this hour, nearly such as it may be conceived to have been when first uncovered by the departure of the sea...
Seite 645 - Saw it into planks, and though now adapted to become permanently useful, its whole beauty is lost forever, or to be regained only in part when decay and ruin shall have withdrawn it again from use, and left it to receive from the hand of nature the velvet moss and varied lichen, which may again suggest ideas of inherent happiness, and tint its mouldering sides with hues of life.
Seite 521 - The Vegetable Kingdom; or, the Structure, Classification, and Uses of Plants, Illustrated upon the Natural System.
Seite 697 - I am very comfortable on board», he wrote, «except when my collections are lying about. When I return laden with plants, I have nowhere to prepare them; and when they are dry the damp insinuates itself to such a degree, that I am compelled to re-dry them. This is very troublesome; and on board a ship, especially a man-of-war, there is no especial place for preparing or preserving plants. I am quite a nuisance to my messmates when I unpack...
Seite 558 - a plant gathered in a celebrated or delightful spot, is like the hair of a friend, more dear to memory than even a portrait, because it excites the imagination without presuming to fill it.

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