English Prose: Selections, Band 3

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Sir Henry Craik
Macmillan and Company, 1894
 

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Seite 145 - All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously but luckily: when he describes anything you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature; he looked inwards, and found her there.
Seite 152 - ... you more than see it. you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation; he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is everywhere alike; were he so, I should do him injury to compare him with the greatest of mankind. He is many times flat and insipid; his comic wit degenerating into clenches, his serious swelling into bombast. But he is always great, when...
Seite 322 - What man is he that desireth life, and loveth many days, that he may see good? 275 Keep thy tongue from evil, and thy lips from speaking guile. Depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it.
Seite 526 - ... of fountains, or resting on beds of flowers ; and could hear a confused harmony of singing birds, falling waters, human 'voices, and musical instruments. Gladness grew in me upon the discovery of so delightful a scene. I wished for the wings of an eagle, that I might fly away to those happy seats : but the genius told me there was no passage to them, except through the gates of death that I saw opening every moment upon the bridge. "
Seite 550 - His death and passion: and grant, that the grace of God, which bringeth salvation, may effectually teach and persuade me to deny ungodliness and worldly lusts, and to live soberly, righteously, and godly in this present world...
Seite 425 - In Pope I cannot read a line, But with a sigh I wish it mine ; When he can in one couplet fix More sense than I can do in six, It gives me such a jealous fit, I cry, 'Pox take him and his wit!
Seite 525 - ... through them into the tide and immediately disappeared. These hidden pitfalls were set very thick at the entrance of the bridge, so that throngs of people no sooner broke through the cloud, but many of them fell into them. They grew thinner towards the middle, but multiplied and lay closer together towards the end of the arches that were entire.
Seite 162 - God's house has eaten him up ; but I am sure it has devoured some part of his good manners and civility.
Seite 372 - I came home to my fortification, not feeling, as we say, the ground I went on, but terrified to the last degree, looking behind me at every two or three steps, mistaking every bush and tree, and fancying every stump at a distance to be a man...
Seite 153 - He was a most severe judge of himself, as well as others. One cannot say he wanted wit, but rather that he was frugal of it.

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