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Books Books 1 - 10 of 25 on ... and compared with the coal itself reduced to powder was found deprived of the....
" ... and compared with the coal itself reduced to powder was found deprived of the greater portion of the bitumen and, in some instances, entirely destitute of it. There is every reason to believe that much coal gas... "
Bulletin - Page 5
1912
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the polytechnic review and magazine of science, literature, and the fine arts

george G. Sigmond - 1845
...There is every reason to believe that much coal gas was made from this dust in the very air itself of the mine by the flame of the fire damp, which raised...along ; and much of the carbon of this dust remained unburut only for want of air. At first we were greatly embarrassed by the circumstance of the large...
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Proceedings of the Literary & Philosophical Society of Liverpool, Issue 49

Literary and Philosophical Society of Liverpool - Humanities - 1895
...coal gas was made from this dust in the very air itself of the mine, by the flame of the fire-damp which raised and swept it along, and much of the carbon...this dust remained unburnt only from want of air. At first we were greatly embarrassed by the circumstance of the large number of deaths from choke damp,...
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Nature, Volume 33

Sir Norman Lockyer - Electronic journals - 1886
...much coal-gas was made from this dust in the very air itself of the mine, by the fame of the firedamp, which raised and swept it along, and much of the carbon of this dust remained unburnt only for want of air." That is to say, the flame of the fire-damp is extended, and the effect of the explosion...
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Annual Report on the Mines

Mines and mineral resources - 1872
...much coal-gas was made from this dust in the very air itself of the mine by the flame of the firedamp, which raised and swept it along ; and much of the carbon of this dust remained unburnt only for want of air." Mr. Galloway, HM Inspector of Mines, read a paper before the Royal Society, in March,...
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Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Volume 24

Electronic journals - 1876
...much coal-gas was made from this dust in the very air itself of the mine by the flame of the firedamp, which raised and swept it along ; and much of the carbon of this dust remained unburnt only for want of air." mmediately from the consideration that, without doubt, combustible gases can supplant...
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The Chemical News and Journal of Physical Science - Vol. XLV, 1882.

william crookes - 1882
...coal-gas was made from this dust in the very air itself of the mine, by the flame of the fire-damp, which raised and swept it along, and much of the carbon of this dust remained unburnt only for want of air. On January lyth, 1845, Faraday delivered a discourse to the members of the Royal Institution,...
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Proceedings, Volume 10

Royal Institution of Great Britain - Science - 1884
...coal gas was made from this dust in the very air itself of the mine, by the flame of the fire-damp, which raised and swept it along, and much of the carbon of this dust remained nnburnt only for want of air. " At first we were greatly embarrassed by the circumstance of the large...
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Nature, Volume 33

Science - 1886
...coal-gas was made from this dust in the Very air itself of the mine, by the Jlame of the firedamp, which raised and swept it along, and much of the carbon of this dust remained unburnt only for want of air." That is to say, the flame of the fire-damp Is extended, and the effect of the explosion...
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Chemical Technology: Or, Chemistry in Its Applications to Arts and Manufactures

Charles Edward Groves, William Thorp, Thomas Richardson, Edmund Ronalds, Henry Watts, William Joseph Dibdin - Chemistry, Technical - 1889
...very air itself of the mine by the flame of the fire-damp which raised it and swept it along, and that much of the carbon of this dust remained unburnt only from want of air. At first we were greatly embarrassed by the circumstance of the large number of deaths from choke-damp,...
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Chemical Technology...

Charles Edward Groves - 1889
...very air itself of the mine by the flame of the fire-damp which raised it and swept it along, and that much of the carbon of this dust remained unburnt only from want of air. At first we were greatly embarrassed by the circumstance of the large number of deaths from choke-damp,...
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