Success in Literature

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Seite 226 - whispers through the trees': If crystal streams 'with pleasing murmurs creep': The reader's threaten'd (not in vain) with 'sleep'. Then, at the last and only couplet fraught With some unmeaning thing they call a thought, A needless Alexandrine ends the song, That, like a wounded snake, drags its slow length along.
Seite 53 - ... an inward prompting which now grew daily upon me, that by labour and intent study, which I take to be my portion in- this life, joined with the strong propensity of nature, I might perhaps leave something so written to after-times, as they should not willingly let it die.
Seite 221 - Entre toutes les différentes expressions qui peuvent rendre une seule de nos pensées , il n'y en a qu'une qui soit la bonne : on ne la rencontre pas toujours en parlant ou en écrivant. Il est vrai néanmoins qu'elle existe; que tout ce qui ne l'est point est faible, et ne satisfait point un homme d'esprit qui veut se faire entendre.
Seite 14 - There is no other method of fixing those thoughts which arise and disappear in the mind of man, and transmitting them to the last periods of time ; no other method of giving a permanency to our ideas, and preserving the knowledge of any particular person, when his body is mixed with the common mass of matter, and his soul retired into the world of spirits. Books arc the legacies that a great genius leaves to mankind, which are delivered down from generation to generation, as presents to the posterity...
Seite 119 - All those I think who have lived as literary men, — working daily as literary labourers, — will agree with me that three hours a day will produce as much as a man ought to write. But then he should so have trained himself that he shall be able to work continuously during those three hours, — so have tutored his mind that it shall not be necessary for him to sit nibbling his pen, and gazing at the wall before him, till he shall have found the words with which he wants to express his ideas.
Seite 129 - Natura fieret laudabile carmen, an arte, Quaesitum est : ego nec studium sine divite vena ; Nec rude quid possit video ingenium : alterius sic Altera poscit opem res, et conjurat amice.
Seite 170 - Another thing, and only one other, I will say. All books are properly the record of the history of past men — what thoughts past men had in them — what actions past men did : the summary of all books whatsoever lies there. It is on this ground that the class of books specifically named History can be safely recommended as the basis of all study of books — the preliminary to all right and full understanding of anything we can expect to find in books. Past history, and especially the past history...
Seite 220 - ... wit is best conveyed to us in the most easy language; and is most to be admired when a great thought comes dressed in words so commonly received, that it is understood by the meanest apprehensions...
Seite 73 - ... he can present his picture in strong and agreeable language to others. He sits down and tells his story because he has a story to tell; as you, my friend, when you have heard something which has at once tickled your fancy or moved your pathos, will hurry to tell it to the first person you meet. But when that first novel has been received graciously by the public and has made for itself a success, then the writer naturally feeling that the writing of novels is within his grasp, looks about for...
Seite 251 - Waverley" was put together with so little care that I cannot boast of having sketched any distinct plan of the work. The whole adventures of Waverley, in his movements up and down the country with the Highland cateran Bean Lean, are managed without much skill.

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Library Record, Bände 19-24

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