Rheumatism; Its Nature, Causes, and Cure: Gout; Its Nature, Causes, Cure, and Prevention

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John Churchill, 1858 - 266 Seiten
 

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Seite 218 - What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unus'd.
Seite 203 - It is only in those parts of the body to which arterial blood, and with it the oxygen absorbed in respiration, is conveyed, that heat is produced. Hair, wool, or feathers do not possess an elevated temperature.
Seite 229 - ... or necessity compels him to have recourse to spirits. He must work, but in consequence of insufficient food, a certain portion of his working power is daily wanting. Spirits, by their action on the nerves, enable him to make up the deficient power at the expense of his body, — to consume to-day that quantity which ought naturally to have been employed a day later.
Seite 40 - ... themselves with fibrin, just as a stick in certain streams coats itself with a calcareous envelope ; and that the preference shown for the left side of the heart admits of explanation by reference to the peculiarities of its contents — the newmade arterial Mood. " You will observe that this theory involves the supposition, that arterial blood is more prone than venous blood to precipitate its fibrin, either as containing more of it, or as containing it in some more separable form.
Seite 41 - ... carried a single thread, by means of a very fine needle, transversely through the artery and vein of a dog, leaving it there so that it might cut the stream ; and I have done this repeatedly, sometimes in the femoral vessels, sometimes with the carotid and jugular, sometimes with the aorta and cava. I have suffered the thread to remain during a period of from twelve to twenty-four hours. My experiments have given me as a uniform result, that the arterial blood with the utmost readiness deposits...
Seite 203 - ... consumed by the oxygen of the atmosphere ; — we find in the work of the same learned author, that the source of animal heat is attributed to the same process of consumption of the carbon and hydrogen of the food by the oxygen of the atmosphere. He...
Seite 223 - Providence has gifted man with reason ; to his reason therefore, is left the choice of his food and drink, and not to instinct, as among the lower animals. It thus becomes his duty to apply his reason to the regulation of his diet, to shun excess in quantity, and what is noxious in quality, to adhere in short to the simple and the natural ; among which the bounty of his Maker has afforded him an ample selection ; and beyond which, if he deviates, sooner or later he will suffer the penalty."— Prout.
Seite 109 - We have frequently occasion to disabuse our patients' minds of very erroneous opinions they have entertained on this point, which have added very seriously to their anxieties by apprehensions of impending disease. Uric acid or urates may be deposited in an insoluble form in the kidney or bladder, and aggregating, form a mass, on which, by a kind of imperfect crystallization, great quantities of the acid or its salts may be deposited, giving rise to the formation of a calculus. Uric acid is of more...
Seite 42 - My experiments have given me as a uniform result, that the arterial blood with the utmost readiness deposits its fibrin on the thread ; the venous blood with the utmost reluctancy. And in most of my experiments, the thread, where it traversed the canal of the artery, presented a very considerable vegetation on its surface (exactly like those we are talking of on the valves of the heart) ; a vegetation sometimes as large as a grain of wheat ; always of a pyramidal shape, with its apex down-stream,...
Seite 229 - On the other hand, when the labourer earns by his work less than is required to provide the amount of food which is indispensable in order to restore fully his working power, an unyielding, inexorable law or necessity compels him to have recourse to spirits. He must work, but in consequence of insufficient food a certain portion of his working power is daily wanting. Spirits, by their action on the nerves, enable him to make up the deficient power at the expense of...

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