General view of the agriculture of the Hebrides, or western isles of Scotland ...

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Printed for R. Phillips, London, 1811 - 824 Seiten
 

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Seite 701 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the...
Seite 73 - Thus every good his native wilds impart, Imprints the patriot passion on his heart; And e'en those ills, that round his mansion rise. Enhance the bliss his scanty fund supplies. Dear is that shed to which his soul conforms, And dear that hill which lifts him to the storms; And as a child, when scaring sounds molest, . . Clings close and closer to the mother's breast, So the loud torrent, and the whirlwind's roar, But bind him to his native mountains more.
Seite 116 - And it shall come to pass in the increase, that ye shall give the fifth part unto Pharaoh, and four parts shall be your own, for seed of the field, and for your food, and 8o for them of your households, and for food for your little ones.
Seite 701 - Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion. To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible, if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish, if it were possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings.
Seite 707 - ... in order to form it ; between the angles, of which, a yellow stalagmitic matter has exuded, which serves to defme the angles precisely, and at the same time vary the colour with a great deal of elegance : And to render it still more agreeable, the whole is lighted from without ; so that the farthest extremity is very plainly seen from without ; and the air within, being agitated by the flux and reflux of the tides, is perfectly dry and wholesome, free entirely from the damp vapours with which...
Seite 712 - have seen many' ancient volcanoes, and I have given descriptions of several superb basaltic causeways, and delightful caverns in the midst of lavas ; but I have never found any thing which comes near to this, or can bear any comparison with it, for the admirable regularity of the columns, the height of the arch, the situation, the form, the elegance of this production of nature, or its resemblance to the masterpieces of art ; though this has had no share in its construction. It is, therefore, not...
Seite 709 - ... of such as have been broken off, which extends as far under water as the eye can reach. Here the forms of the pillars -are apparent : these are of three, four, five, six, and seven sides, but the numbers of five and six are by much the most prevalent.
Seite 706 - ... in natural colonnades, according as the bays or points of land formed themselves, upon a firm basis of solid unformed rock...
Seite 701 - WE were now treading that illustrious Island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion.
Seite 684 - Within this ile of Colmkill, there is ane sanctuary also, or kirkzaird, callit in Erische Religoran, quhilk is a very fair kirkzaird, and weill biggit about with staine and lyme. Into this sanctuary ther is three tombes of staine, formit like little chapels, with ane braid gray marble or quhin staine in the gavill of ilk ane of the tombes.

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