The General Biographical Dictionary: Containing an Historical and Critical Account of the Lives and Writings of the Most Eminent Persons in Every Nation: Particulary the British and Irish; from the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time, Band 25

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Alexander Chalmers
J. Nichols, 1816
 

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Seite 59 - Nothing then was to be heard but the shrieks of women, the screams of children, and the cries of men ; some calling for their children, others for their parents, others for their husbands, and only distinguishing each other by their voices ; one lamenting his own fate, another that of his family ; some wishing to die from the very fear of dying ; some lifting their hands to the gods ; but, the greater part imagining that the last and eternal night was come, which was to destroy the gods and the world...
Seite 495 - It is not lawful for any man to take upon him the office of public preaching, or ministering the Sacraments in the Congregation, before he be lawfully called, and sent to execute the same. And those we ought to judge lawfully called and sent...
Seite 57 - As soon as it was light again, which was not till the third day after this melancholy accident, his body was found entire, and without any marks of violence upon it, exactly in the same posture that he fell, and looking more like a man asleep than dead.
Seite 2 - The wretch who, after having seen the consequences of a thousand errors, continues still to blunder, and whose age has only added obstinacy to stupidity, is surely the object of either abhorrence or contempt, and deserves not that his gray hairs should secure him from insult.
Seite 56 - ... and black pieces of burning rock : they were likewise in danger, not only of being aground by the sudden retreat of the sea, but also from the vast fragments which rolled down from the mountain, and obstructed all the shore. Here he stopped to consider whether he should return back again ; to which the pilot advising him, ' Fortune,' said he, ' befriends the brave ; carry me to Pomponianus.
Seite 57 - There my uncle, having drunk a draught or two of cold water, threw himself down upon a cloth which was spread for him, when immediately the flames, and a strong smell of sulphur, which was the forerunner of them, dispersed the rest of the company, and obliged him to rise.
Seite 177 - I never in my life knew a man that had so tender a heart for his particular friends, or more general friendship for mankind.
Seite 57 - They consulted together whether it would be most prudent to trust to the houses, which now shook from side to side with frequent and violent concussions ; or fly to the open fields, where the calcined stones and cinders, though light indeed, yet fell in large showers, and threatened destruction.
Seite 166 - Miscellany, in a volume which began with the pastorals of Philips, and ended with those of Pope. The same year was written the Essay on Criticism ; a work which displays such extent of comprehension, such nicety of distinction, such acquaintance with mankind, and such knowledge both of ancient and modern learning, as are not often attained by the maturest age and longest experience. It was published about two years afterwards ; and being praised by Addison in the Spectator* with sufficient liberality,...
Seite 449 - He lov'd his friends (forgive this gushing tear : Alas ! I feel, I am no actor here) He lov'd his friends with such a warmth of heart, So clear of interest, so devoid of art, Such generous friendship, such unshaken zeal, No words can speak it; but our tears may tell.-— O candid truth, O faith without a stain, O manners gently firm, and nobly plain, O sympathizing love of others...

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