A System of Natural Philosophy: In which the Principles of Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Hydraulics, Pneumatics, Accoustics, Optics, Astronomy, Electricity and Magnetism, are Familiarly Explained, and Illustrated by More Than Two Hundred Engravings. To which are Added Questions for the Examination of the Pupils. Designed for the Use of Schools and Academies

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D.F. Robinson & Company, 1830 - 295 Seiten
 

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Seite 2 - Congress of the United States, entitled, "An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned." And also to the Act, entitled, " An Act supplementary to an Act, entitled, ' An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned,' and extending the benefits thereof...
Seite 2 - BBOWN, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit : " Sertorius : or, the Roman Patriot.
Seite 108 - The people in the neighbourhood, as usual, ascribed its actions to some sort of witchery, and advised the doctor, in case it did* not ebb and flow readily, when he and his friend were both present, that one of them should retire, and see what the spring would do, when only the other was present. HYDRAULICS.
Seite 238 - It will be observed by a careful perusal of the above explanation of the seasons, and a close inspection of the figure by which it is illustrated, that the sun constantly shines on a portion of the earth equal to 90 degrees north, and 90 degrees south from his place in the heavens, and consequently, that he always enlightens 180 degrees, or one half of the earth. If, therefore, the axis of the earth were perpendicular to the plane of its orbit, the days and nights would...
Seite 208 - The names of the 12 signs of the zodiac are, Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius, and Pisces. The...
Seite 217 - Different opinions have been advanced by astronomers respecting the cause of these appearances. By some they have been regarded as clouds, or as openings in the atmosphere of the planet, while others imagine that they are the marks of great natural changes, or revolutions, which are perpetually agitating the surface of that planet. It is, however, most probable, that these appearances are produced by the agency of some cause, of which we, on this little earth, must always be entirely ignorant.
Seite 130 - ... came to prepare with all haste for a storm. The barometer had begun to fall with appalling rapidity. As yet, the oldest sailors had not perceived even a threatening in the sky, and were surprised at the extent and hurry of the preparations: but the required measures were not completed, when a more awful hurricane burst upon them than the most experienced had ever braved. Nothing could withstand it; the sails already furled and closely bound to the yards, were riven away in tatters; even the bare...
Seite 282 - ... the excited substance, and therefore must be transferred from the hand, or silk, to the electric. In the same manner, when the cylinder is made to revolve, the electric matter, in consequence of the friction, leaves the cushion, and is accumulated on the glass cylinder; that is, the cushion becomes negatively, and the glass positively electrified. The fluid, being thus excited, is prevented from escaping by the silk flap, until it comes to the vicinity of the metallic points, by which it is conveyed...
Seite 266 - The cause of the tides is the attraction of the sun and moon, but chiefly of the moon on the waters of the ocean. In virtue of the universal principle of gravitation...
Seite 197 - From this it is evident that, if the eye of the spectator is moved to another position, he will not see the red ray coming from the same drop of rain, but only the blue, and if to another position, the green, and so of all the others. But in a shower of rain, there are drops at all heights and distances, and though they perpetually change their places, in respect to the sun and the eye, as they fall, still there will be many which will be in such a position as to reflect the red rays to the. eye,...

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