Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

COMMENTARY

ON

THE ACT

FOR THE

COMMUTATION OF TITHES

IN ENGLAND AND WALES.

BY THE

REV. GEORGE BURGES,

Vicar of Halvergate and of Moulton,

in Norfolk.

LONDON:

J. G. and F. RIVINGTON;

AND

MATCHETT, STEVENSON, AND MATCHETT,

NORWICH.

MDCCCXXXVIII.

32.

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

ADVERTISEMENT.

I regret that this. Tract makes its appearance so late: It has been longer in going through the press than I had calculated upon.

I fear I must not hope that any thing here advanced will induce many of my Clerical Brethren to pause in their career of “ Voluntary Commutation.” Still, some good may be effected, should these pages only render them more upon their guard against a subtle, unrelenting adversary.

The great end this Commentary has in view is to dissuade them from engaging in “ Voluntary Agreements " for their Tithes, on the ground that, by such agreements, nine clergymen out of ten will be injured. For

my own part, I would rather diminish

my preferment one half by a “Compulsory Award,” than be a party in so sad a transaction as the overthrowing that right which both God and man have, for so many centuries, invested us with. If the sacrilege must be committed, let it be committed by those who were the contrivers of it; and there, and there alone, “let the great axe fall."

[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

I HOPE I shall stand excused, in the present state of tithe matters among us, for hazarding a few remarks on a subject with which I am, I confess, not very intimately acquainted. Still I may know as much about it as many that will soon figure among us in the capacity of Sub-Commissioners, Solicitors, Tithe and Land Agents, &c., who, to do them justice, seldom acknowledge any ignorance where there is a prospect of the least gain.

This “ACT FOR THE COMMUTATION OF TITHES IN ENGLAND AND WALES” is now become a law of the land, and my Reverend Brethren-for I write this work for you, and address myself to you-we must obey it, and we will faithfully obey it. Still we are, I presume, at liberty to protest against any law which we may think injurious, and to speak our full convictions of its tendency. We are not, I trust, even yet so down-hearted, so lost to the dignity of our calling, as to suffer and say nothing; as to read every clause of this Act-baleful as the deadly night-shade-and exclaim, o, what a tender and affectionate nursing mother of the Church!

B

« ZurückWeiter »