The Indian Races of North and South America: Comprising an Account of the Principal Aboriginal Races; a Description of Their National Customs, Mythology, and Religious Ceremonies; the History of Their Most Powerful Tribes, and of Their Most Celebrated Chiefs and Warriors; Their Intercourse and Wars with the European Settlers; and a Great Variety of Anecdote and Description, Illustrative of Personal and National Character

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American Subscription House, 1857 - 640 Seiten
 

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Seite 299 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it: I have killed many: I have fully glutted my vengeance: for my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbour a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Seite 299 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the Whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, ' Logan is the friend of white men.
Seite 160 - Pocahontas, the King's dearest daughter, when no entreaty could prevail, got his head in her arms, and laid her own upon his to save him from death...
Seite 157 - ... and a rattle in his hand. With most strange gestures and passions, he began his invocation, and environed the fire with a circle of...
Seite 365 - The Americans are now led by a chief who never sleeps: the night and the day are alike to him. And during all the time that he has been marching upon our villages, notwithstanding the watchfulness of our young men, we have never been able to surprise him. Think well of it. There is something whispers me, it would be prudent to listen to his offers of peace.
Seite 532 - It was conducted over pathless sierras buried in snow; galleries were cut for leagues through the living rock ; rivers were crossed by means of bridges that swung suspended in the air ; precipices were scaled by stairways hewn out of the native bed ; ravines of hideous depth were filled up with solid masonry...
Seite 158 - Having feasted him after their best barbarous manner they could, a long consultation was held, but the conclusion was, two great stones were brought before Powhatan : then as many as could...
Seite 171 - Having reaccommodated themselves, they solemnly invited him to their lodgings, where he was no sooner within the house, but all these Nymphes more tormented him then ever, with crowding, pressing, and hanging about him, most tediously crying, Love you not me?
Seite 182 - Nay, so great was our famine, that a Savage we slew and buried, the poorer sort took him up again and eat him; and so did divers one another boiled and stewed with roots and herbs: And one amongst the rest did kill his wife, powdered her, and had eaten part of her before it was known; for which he was executed, as he well deserved: now whether she was better roasted, boiled or carbonado'd, I know not; but of such a dish as powdered wife I never heard of.
Seite 283 - I do not sleep; I have my eyes open, and the sun which enlightens me, discovers to me a great captain at the head of a company of soldiers, who speaks as if he were dreaming. He says that he only came to the lake to smoke on the great calumet with the Onondagas ; but Garangula says that he sees the contrary ; that it was to knock them on the head if sickness had not weakened the arms of the French.

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