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A very beadle to a humorous figh; A critic ; nay, a night-watch conftable; A domineering pedant o'er the boy, Than whom no mortal more magnificent ! This wimpled,[8] whining, purblind, wayward boy ; This fignior Junio's giant-dwarf,[9] Dan Cupid ; Regent of love-rhymes, lord of folded arms, The anointed fovereign of sighs and groans; Liege of all loiterers and malcontents ; Dread prince of plackets, king of codpieces ; Sole imperator and great general Of trotting paritors :[1]—o my little heart !)And I to be a corporal of his field, And wear his colours, like a tumbler's hoop ! What? what? I love ! I fue ! I seek a wife ! A woman, that is like a German clock,[2] Still a repairing ; ever out of frame; And never going aright, being a watch, But being watch'd, that it may still go right? Nay, to be perjur'd, which is worst of all ; And, among three, to love the worst of all : A whitely wanton with a velvet brow, With two pitch balls stuck in her face for eyes ; Ay, and by heaven, one that will do the deed, Though Argus were her eunuch and her guard á And I to figh for her! to watch for her! To pray for her! Go to; it is a plague

(8) The 'wimple' was a hood or veil, which fell over the face. Had Shakespeare been acquainted with the flammeum of the Romans, or the gem which represents the marriage of Cupid and Psyche, his choice of the epithet would have been much applauded by all the advocates in favour of his learning. In Isaiah, chap. iii. v. 22, we find the mantles, and the

wimples, and the crisping-pins." STEEV.

(9) Mr. Upton has made a very ingenious conjecture on this passage. He read3,- This fignior Julio's giant-dwarf'--Shakefpeare, says he, intended to compliment Julio Romano, who drew Cupid in the character of a giantdwarf. Dr. Warburton thinks, that by 'Junio' is meant youth in general.

JOHNS. (1) An 'apparitor,' or 'paritor,' is an ofacer of the bishop's court who carries out citations ; as citations are most frequently iffucd for fornication, the “paritor' is put under Cupid's government. JOHNS.

[2] The following extract is taken from a book called The Artificial Clockmaker, 1744:-“ Clock-making was supposed to have had its begin"ning in Germany within less than these two hundred years. It is very " probable, that our balance-clocks or watches, and fume other automata, "might have had their beginning there ; &c.” To the inartificial conAtruction of these firit pieces of mechanism, executed in Germany, we inay fuppose Shakespeare alludes. The clock at Hampton-Court, which was fet up in 1540, (as appears from the inscription affixed to it) is said to be the firft ever fabricated in England. STEEV.

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