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If he had any faults, he has left us in doubt;
At least, in six weeks I could not find 'em out;
Yet some have declared, and it can't be denied 'em,
That sly-boots was cursedly cunning to hide 'em.

Here lies our good Edmund, whose genius was such,
We scarcely can praise it or blame it too much;
Who, born for the universe, narrowed his mind,
And to party gave up what was meant for mankind;
Though fraught with all learning, yet straining his

throat
To persuade Tommy Townshend to lend him a vote ;
Who, too deep for his hearers, still went on refining,
And thought of convincing, while they thought of

dining;
Though equal to all things, for all things unfit;
Too nice for a statesman, too proud for a wit,
For a patriot too cool, for a drudge disobedient,
And too fond of the right to pursue the expedient.
In short, 'twas his fate, unemployed, or in place, sir,
To eat mutton cold, and cut blocks with a razor.

Here lies honest William, whose heart was a mint,
While the owner ne'er knew half the good that was in't;
The pupil of impulse, it forced him along,
His conduct still right, with his argument wrong;
Still aiming at honour, yet fearing to roam,
The coachman was tipsy, the chariot drove home
Would

you

ask for his merits ?-alas ! he had none : What was good was spontaneous, his faults were his own.

Here lies honest Richard, whose fate I must sigh at; Alas, that such frolic should now be so quiet!

What spirits were his! What wit and what whim !
Now breaking a jest, and now breaking a limb;
Now wrangling and grumbling to keep up the ball,
Now teasing and vexing, yet laughing at all !

Here Cumberland lies, having acted his parts.
The Terence of England, the mender of hearts,
A flattering painter, who made it his care
To draw men as they ought to be, not as they are.

Here lies David Garrick, describe him who can;
An abridgment of all that was pleasant in man.
As an actor, confessed without rival to shine:
As a wit, if not first, in the very first line :
Yet with talents like these, and an excellent heart,
The man had his failings, a dupe to his art.
Like an ill-judging beauty, his colours he spread,
And beplastered with rouge his own natural red.
On the stage he was natural, simple, affecting;
"Twas only that when he was off he was acting.
With no reason on earth to go out of his way,
He turned and he varied full ten times a day :
Though secure of our hearts, yet confoundedly sick
If they were not his own by finessing and trick:
He cast off his friends, as a huntsman his pack,
For he knew when he pleased he could whistle them back,
Of praise a mere glutton, he swallowed what came;
And the puff of a dunce, he mistook it for fame;
Till his relish grown callous, almost to disease,
Who peppered the highest, was surest to please.
But let us be candid, and speak out our mind :
If dunces applauded, he paid them in kind.

Ye Kenricks, ye Kellys, and Woodfalls & What a commerce was yours, while you go How did Grub-street re-echo the shouts While he was be-Rosciused, and you wer But peace to his spirit, wherever it flies, To act as an angel and mix with the ski Those poets who owe their best fame to Shall still be his flatterers, go where he Old Shakespeare receive him with praise And Beaumonts and Bens be his Kellys

CITY NIGHT PIECE.

The clock has just struck two; the rises and sinks in the socket; the watch hour in slumber; the laborious and th rest; and nothing wakes but meditation and despair. The drunkard once more f ing bowl; the robber walks his midnig the suicide lifts his guilty arm against person.

Let me no longer waste the night o antiquity or the sallies of contempora pursue the solitary walk, where Vanity, but a few hours past walked before kept up the pageant, and now, seems hushed with her own importuniti

What a gloom hangs all around! I feebly emits a yellow gleam; no sound the chiming clock, or the distant watc

like a

bustle of human pride is forgotten; an hour like this may well display the emptiness of human vanity.

There will come a time, when this temporary solitude may be made continual, and the city itself, like its inhabitants, fade away, and leave a desert in its room.

What cities, as great as this, have once triumphed in existence, had their victories as great, joy as just and as unbounded ; and with short-sighted presumption, promised themselves immortality. Posterity can hardly trace the situation of some; the sorrowful traveller wanders over the awful ruins of others; and, as he beholds, he learns wisdom, and feels the transcience of every sublunary possession. Here,”

,” he cries, “ stood their citadel, now grown over with weeds; there their senate-house, but now the haunt of every noxious reptile ; temples and theatres stood here, now only an undistinguished heap of ruin.”

They are fallen, for luxury and avarice first made them feeble. The rewards of the state were conferred on amusing, and not on useful, members of society. Their riches and opulence invited the invaders, who, though at first repulsed, returned again, conquered by perseverance, and at last swept the dependents into undistinguished destruction.

How few appear in those streets which but some few hours ago were crowded ; and those who appear, now no longer wear their daily mask, nor attempt to hide their misery

But who are those who make the streets their couch, and find a short repose from wretchedness at the doors of the opulent? These are strangers, wanderers, and orphans, whose circumstances are too humble to expect redress, and their distresses are too great even for pity.

Their wretchedness excites rather horror. Some are without the covering even of rags, and others emaciated with disease; the world has disclaimed them; society turns its back upon their distress, and has given them

up

to nakedness and hunger. Why, why was I born a man, and yet see the sufferings of wretches I cannot relieve! Poor houseless creatures ! the world will give you reproaches, but will not give you relief. The slightest misfortunes of the great, the most imaginary uneasiness of the rich, are aggravated with all the power of eloquence, and held up to engage our attention and sympathetic sorrow: The poor weep unheeded, persecuted by every subordinate species of tyranny; and every law which gives others security, becomes an enemy to them.

Why was this heart of mine formed with so much sensibility ? or why was not my fortune adapted to its impulse? Tenderness, without a capacity of relieving, only makes the man who feels it more wretched than the object which sues for assistance.

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