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of her vesture; but may be generally But the practice of appealing to the known from the original by a greater depaffions needs little encouragement, as all gree of oftentation, pageantry, and parade, parties naturally give into it; and the more numerous and more zealous external groisest absurdities, and most manifest con- observations of meats, drinks, cloths, days, tradictions, are every day seconded and en- &c. And the enemies of the former could forced by such appeals : nevertheless they never have hit on a more plausible method are of service, when reason and truth are of driving her from the earth, than their at the helm, by ensuring attention, and multiplication of supernumerary principles, confirming belief; and it is not to be fup- annexing to them the specious epithet of posed that our passions were given us for effential, and persuading mankind to tag no other end, but to put us to the trouble them on to those which are really such, of totally mortifying or extirpating them that the whole being jumbled and con

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1 indispensible rule for a king is, to ply him in every war that is necessary, eiftudy the interest of the nation, to be ever ther for their own preservation, or the in it, and to be always pursuing it; this preservation of those allies, with whom will lay in for him such a degree of con- mutual interests and leagues unite him.--fidence, that he will be ever safe with his Nothing creates to a prince such a confi. people, when they feel they are safe in dence, as a constant and clear firmness him. No part of our history shews this and steadiness of government, with an unmore visibly, than queen Elizabeth's reign, blemished integrity in all his profeflions ; in which the true interest of the nation was and nothing will create a more universal constantly pursued ; and this was so well dependence on him, than when it is Raderstood by all, that everything else visible he studies to allay the heats of was forgiven her and her ministers both parties, and to reconcile them to one anoSir Simon d'Ewe's Journal Thews a treat ther: this will demonstrate, that he loves ment of parliaments, that could not have his people, and that he has no ill designs of been borne at any other time, or under his own. any other administration. --- A prince, A prince who would be well served, that would command the affections and ought to seek out among his subjects the purses of this nation, must not study best and most capable of the youth, and to stretch his prerogative, or be un- see to their good education at home and easy under the restraints of law. As abroad; he Tould send them to travel, soon as this humour Mews itself, he and order his ministers abroad to keep muft expect, that a jealousy of hin, and such for some time about them, and to an uneafy opposition to him, will fol- send them from court to court, to learn low through the whole course of his reign; their language, and to observe their temwherea's if he governs well, parliaments pers: if but twelve such were constantly will fruft him, as much as a wise prince kept on an allowance of 250 1. a year, the

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• If ever such a plan as this was to take effect, the allowance must be more than 230 1. now. Since the bishop wrote this, many years have elapsed, and every thing is greatly advanced ; but fupposing there was 400 l, allotted to each, fill the expence is trifling.

• King William committed the disposal of ecclefiaftical preferments, solely to the queen, as the by living in the nation was better acquainted with the clergy and their merits. It is well known how many excellent persons the preferred, during her short reign.

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