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this volume for the press, and now submit it to the members of the Methodist Church.

If in these pages we have contributed any thing toward the advancement of religious truth-if in recounting the difficulties under which Methodism was planted in Ken. tucky, its principles shall be rendered dearer to the Church - and if we have recovered the memory of any of those worthies to whom, under God, we are so greatly indebted for the rich inheritance they have bequeathed us, we shall feel that our labor has not been in vain.

A. H. REDFORD. NASHVILLE, TENN., May 1, 1868.

METHODISM IN KENTUCKY.

HISTORY

OF

METHODISM IN KENTUCKY.

CHAPTER I.

FROM THE SETTLEMENT OF KENTUCKY TO THE CONFER

ENCE OF 1787.

Daniel Boone_James McBride-Dr. Walker-John Finley—The

early emigrants-Kentucky formed into a county-Indian cruelties -James Haw, Benjamin Ogden, the first Methodist missionaries to Kentucky-William Hickman-James Smith-Elijah, Lewis, and Joseph Craig-Tanner-Bailey-Bledsoe-Baptist Church organized—The Presbyterian Church—David Rice-Blythe-Lyle -Welch-McNamar-Stone-Reynolds Stewart—First Presbytery formed-Bishop Asbury-Benjamin Ogden, a revolutionary soldier–Francis Clark-William J. Thompson—Nathanael Harris -Gabriel and Daniel Woodfield-Philip Taylor-Joseph Ferguson -Methodism planted in Kentucky by Francis Clark, a local preacher-John Durham-Thomas Stevenson_Mrs. Sarah Stevenson—The character of the early preachers--Mrs. Jane Stamper.

The early history of Kentucky presents a record of savage cruelties, of extreme suffering, and of heroic endurance. The name of Daniel Boone, the

, first white settler who sought a home arnid its dark

VOL. I.

(17)

and almost impenetrable forests, and whose dust now slumbers beneath its soil, will always be held in kind remembrance. The first discovery of Kentucky, however, was made by James McBride, who as early as 1754 "passed down the Ohio River, with some others, in canoes, landed at the mouth of the Kentucky River, and marked the initials of his name and date upon a tree.”* Four years later, Dr. Walker, led by curiosity, or by the spirit of adventure, made a brief trip to the north-eastern portion of the District.† Nine years afterward, and only two years previous to the date of Boone's first entrance into Kentucky, John Finley, with some other Indian-traders from North Carolina, made a considerable tour through it. $ The stay, however, of McBride, Walker, and Finley, was short, and to Daniel Boone belongs the honor of being the first pioneer.

The first emigrants to the District of Kentucky were chiefly composed of men who were “rough, independent, and simple in their habits, careless and improvident in their dealings, frank of speech, and unguarded in their intercourse with each other and with strangers, friendly, hospitable, and generous.” Deprived of educational advantages, they were generally their own school-masters, and their book the volume of nature. It was not the dull, the unaspiring, the idle, but the bold, the resolute,

* Methodist Magazine, Vol. III., p. 386. + Collins's Kentucky, p. 18. $ Methodist Magazine, Vol. III., p. 386.

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