Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

in the same grave with his brother and his son: a tablet in the south aisle of the church bears the following inscription :

NEAR THIS PLACE LIES INTERRED ALL

THAT WAS MORTAL OF THE

RIGHT HONOURABLE EDMUND BURKE,

WHO DIED ON THE 9TH OF JULY, 1797, AGED 68 YEARS : IN THE SAME GRAVE ARE DEPOSITED THE REMAINS OF HIS ONLY SON,

RICHARD BURKE, Esq., REPRESENTATIVE IN PARLIAMENT FOR THE BOROUGH OF MALTON, WHO DIED THE 2ND AUGUST, 1794, AGED 35 :

OF HIS BROTHER,

RICHARD BURKE, Esq.,
BARRISTER-AT-LAW, AND RECORDER OF THE CITY OF BRISTOL,
WHO DIED ON THE 4TH FEBRUARY, 1794 :

AND OF HIS WIDOW,

JANE MARY BURKE,
WHO DIED ON THE 2ND APRIL, 1812, AGED 78.

Such was the unsullied life, and such the dignified departure of Edmund Burke - orator, statesman, writer, patriot, philanthropist-admirable; husband, father, relative, friend-admirable also. His conduct without vice; his bearing, gallant, unaffected, and courteous; his mind potent in the acquisition of all knowledge, and continually ready to impart it; his spirit inflexible in integrity, and intolerant of oppression; his heart copious in affections public and private, and his soul devoted to religion-with such attributes this great man realised, more than any other personage in history, a combination of the heroic qualities of classic Greece and Rome, with whatever was beautiful in the chivalry of modern and Christian Europe. That Burke always cherished this country, and her happy constitution with the

ardour and freshness of a bridal love, his whole existence passed in her service, sufficiently attests : that his views and his policy were right, subsequent events now make indisputable: and there can be as little doubt, that the verdure of gratitude will decorate his memory, whilst this nation, its right feelings and its prosperity endure." His immortality," said Grattan, “is that which is common to Cicero or to Bacon, —that which can never be interrupted while there exists the beauty of order, or the love of virtue, and which can fear no death except what barbarity may impose on the globe.”

Of Mr. Burke's immediate family, none survived himself, but his widow, and his niece, Mrs. Haviland and her son. Mrs. Burke continued until her demise the 2d April, 1812, to reside at Butler's Court, visited and esteemed by all the friends of her late husband. Mrs. Haviland was the only daughter of Mr. Burke's only sister, Juliana, wife of William French Esq., of Loughrea, in the county of Galway. Mrs. Haviland espoused in 1792, Colonel Thomas Haviland, who was the only son of General William Haviland, of Penn in Buckinghamshire, near Beaconsfield, and who died shortly after the marriage. The sole issue of this union was a son, who on the decease of his mother, in March 1816, became the lineal representative of the family: he has assumed the name and arms of his grand-uncle, and is the present Thomas Haviland Burke, Esq., of Lincoln's Inn, Barrister-at-law.

A word or two about Beaconsfield, and this narrative concludes. The residence of Butler's Court, after Mrs. Burke's death, was let to a clergyman named Jones, for the purposes of a school, and, while in his occupation, it was burnt down, on the morning

of the 23d April, 1813. In the century previous to the time of Burke, his lands at Beaconsfield had formed a portion of the estate of another Edmund—the poet Waller, who, although a slippery politician, was a bard of fair repute. Here, returning from exile, Waller terminated his days in retirement, amid the recollections of his blighted ambition, and his bygone love for Sacharissa, and the other aristocratic objects of his poetic affections. Lipscomb, in his History of the County of Buckingham, thus describes Beaconsfield whilst in Burke's possession:-“The diversified combination of woods, hills, valleys, and beautiful enclosures by which the residence of Burke assumed a resemblance of Chilton, Wotton, Cliefden; and the splendid colonnades which gave it, at a little distance, the dignity of a royal residence in miniature, by its similitude to Queen Charlotte's palace, called Buckingham House, in St. James' Park, together with the magic name of Burke, rendered it an object of very general curiosity.” There is now scarcely a vestige of the place—nothing, indeed, remains but the lasting halo of its departed greatness.

THE WISDOM AND GENIUS

OF

THE RIGHT HON. EDMUND BURKE.

CHAPTER I.

THE SOVEREIGN, THE PARLIAMENT, AND THE BRITISH

CONSTITUTION.

“ We thought ourself thy lawful king :
And if we be, how dare thy joints forget
To pay their awful duty to our presence ?
If we be not, show us the hand of God
That hath dismissed us from our stewardship :
For well we know, no hand of blood and bone
Can gripe the sacred handle of our sceptre,
Unless he do profane, steal, or usurp.”—SHAKESPEARE.

“ Law, and form, and due proportion,
Showing, as in a model, our firm estate.”—Ditto.

THE SOVEREIGN.

OF

TITLE TO THE

THE

IE SOVEREIGN GREAT BRITAIN'S RIGHT OF
SUCCESSION AND

CROWN. — His (Dr. Price's) doctrines affect our constitution in its vital parts. He tells the Revolution Society, in this political sermon, that his majesty “is almost the only lawful king in the world, because the only one who owes his crown to the choice of his people.

This doctrine, as applied to the prince now on the

B

« ZurückWeiter »